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  • Written by Amiee White
  • Category: Food Je t'Aimee

Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design

If you come here often enough, you've probably noticed that it's been an interesting month around Food, Je t'Aimée, with a number of exciting opportunities coming my way, and as a result, lots of different content! 

This post is no exception! 

Last week, myself and Kathy Jollimore of Eat Halifax! (and soon of The Record Shop) were invited down to  Chocolates by Design (1360 Lower Water Street) to check out their wares. If you haven't yet visited this chocolate-lovers haven, my goodness you're in for a treat when you do! Together, Kathy and I sampled a number of beautiful, individually wrapped chocolates, baking chocolates, and a steaming, decadent mug of milk hot chocolate.
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Baking Chocos in white, milk, and dark.
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design

Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design

Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
My milk hot chocolate. Incredible.

Husband-and-wife team, Omar and Lama, drew inspiration from the streets of Dubai for their shop, where intricately wrapped and beautifully decorated chocolates are all the rage. It all began when Lama was pregnant with her first child and wanted to have these kinds of chocolates as favours for her baby shower guests. Out of luck finding any in Halifax, she decided to start making her own, and Chocolates by Designwas born. Now, you can visit their shop to have party, shower, or wedding favours designed especially for your celebration, to complement your theme, and to work with your budget. You can see some of Lama's incredible handiwork below.
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Chocolates by Design use and import a number of premium and pure source chocolates, including Belgian Belcolade. Omar has wholesale rates, too, for those who need top notch chocolate in bulk.
After you've pressed your nose against their display case and swooned over the choices (yes, that is a wall of chocolates you see behind Omar below!), you can grab an ice cream, a chocolatey drink, or coffee at their espresso and choco bar. They also serve baked goods and sweets, like macarons and cheesecake, and snacks, like sandwiches and samosas. Even better? For under $10, you have yourself a pot of chocolate fondue. Tell me that isn't the best way to pass an afternoon downtown? 

What's more is that they are one of the few coffee shops in town that stay open late. Really late! Their hours are Monday through Thusday, 7am-11pm, Friday and Saturday, 7am-12am, and Sunday 8:30am-10:30pm.

Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
You can choose 100g of premium chocolate (approx. 5) from the wall behind Omar for $5
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
A glorious wall of chocolate.
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Some of the cupcake wrappers you can buy in-store or online.

I absolutely loved the cupcake wrappers they have for sale (perfect for Muffin Monday!), and can't wait to get my hands on some. You can see what they actually look like when wrapped around a cupcake, along with their other gift arrangements and products, by visiting their online shop.

Chocolates by Design is an excellent and most welcome addition to our downtown core!

Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design
Local Biz Spotlight: Chocolates By Design

From their website:

"Recognizing the love for gourmet chocolates, we strive to present our customers with high quality gourmet chocolates elegantly wrapped and designed for their special occasions.

Our imported Belgian gourmet chocolates are manufactured using ingredients of the highest quality to give you a variety of luxurious and delicious flavours that will surely suit the different tastes of our customers.

Our unique gourmet chocolate products have not been available before in the local market, so if you are looking for a stylish and tasty gift or some gourmet chocolate for yourself, our rich variety of smooth and silky gourmet chocolates will surely satisfy your taste buds."

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  • Written by Amiee White
  • Category: Food Je t'Aimee

Lorne Caborn: On Mixology, Captain Morgan, Tall Ships, and You

If this sentence doesn't make any sense to you, then you're in the right place! Despite this highly popularized idea, Bond's understanding of the classic Martini was really quite elementary. Apparently, shaking a Martini bruises - i.e, breaks apart - the ice and leaves remnants of it throughout your drink. How uncivilized! A Martini should only be stirred, my friends.

As you've probably guessed, I have something a little different for you today. I recently went down to the Halifax waterfront, where I had the vast pleasure of meeting local mixologist, Lorne Caborn, and learning a thing or two about the signature cocktails he created with Captain Morgan to celebrate Tall Ships 2012. The Tall Ships festival is happening in Halifax for 10 days, from July 19-29. You can read more about the festival here. While you're at it, be sure to check out Taste of Nova Scotia's Food Fare by the Sea, too.

Lorne: My personal transition between the two isn’t clear, and I still consider myself a bartender. 18 years ago, I was slinging drinks in pubs, and all I knew was that I had to get drinks out fast. I think I made the trasition when I started working in hiring establishments and had more time to play around with garnishes, aesthetics, and flavours. While cooking and making drinks at Café Chianti, for example, I learned how food flavours translated into making cocktails and pairings, and learned to appreciate the undertones of the drinks I was making there. I worked my way through the line, starting as a dishwasher. I did end up taking a bartending course, eventually, but I find those courses are a mixed bag. Most places want to train you in their own way and style. I learned a lot from the course - it was incredibly useful - but I recommend taking a course after you’ve already worked as a bartender, not as a means to getting a job.
Lorne Caborn: On Mixology, Captain Morgan, Tall Ships, and You
Photo by Megan Chandler. Used with permission.


A: So how did you get involved with Captain Morgan and Tall Ships?
L: I was approached by their ad agency to see if I was interested in creating a cocktail for the Tall Ships Festival this year, and I was completely honoured, considering what a big deal the festival is in Halifax. I'm one of these people who does this for a career, but genuinely loves (and geeks out about) what they do. It's all a labour of love. And truthfully, Captain Morgan Private Stock is incredible. It's a great product, so I was happy to work with it. It's a very smooth and mellow rum, with vanilla undertones. I drink it on the rocks. Can’t say that for many products!
Lorne Caborn: On Mixology, Captain Morgan, Tall Ships, and You
Photo by Megan Chandler. Used with permission.


A: Walk me through the cocktails you made for Captain Morgan:
L: The first one is called "Morgan Takes Manhattan" [Recipes Below]. With the history behind the Tall Ships and this being the bicentennial of the War of 1812, I wanted one drink to reflect that history, and the Manhattan is a really old cocktail. This is my version of the classic. This is more of a formal drink you could have with dinner.
The second cocktail is called "Morgan’s Martimer." It has less to do with the festival and more to do with representing Nova Scotia in a summer drink. I used seasonal, local strawberries to make this drink nice, light, and breezy; perfect for an afternoon on a patio or a backyard BBQ.
I wanted to strike a balance with a formal drink and a light drink, so that these recipes could appeal and be accessible to everyone.

A: What do you do with people like me? Enlighten me! Turn me into a backyard bar maven!
L: You know, it all starts in the same place as when you need a new recipe for dinner: on Google!  Also, the My NSLC website has loads of bartenders and mixologists on there offering tips and recipes. There are drink ideas, centerpiece ideas, food recipes, glassware, pairing ideas... it's really a one stop shop. It's user friendly and direct.
I find the biggest mistake some people make when they begin their home bartending mission is picking up a bartending book. They can be daunting if you don’t know some of the lingo or ingredients already. Some cocktails use complicated ingredients, but if you know their flavours, you know what to substitute it with from your own cupboards. Personally, I prefer to use online resources and videos, which are more visual. The books aren’t meant to be intimidating, but really can be if you're just starting out.
For example, a book might tell you that Martinis shouldn’t be shaken, they should be stirred, because it bruises the ice. (Sorry, Bond!) Or a book will tell you to use soda water to chill your glasses first, but not tap water. Why? There are really good reason for why we do these things, and I find an instructional video tends to go into those explanations, whereas a book might assume you know and then move on. Book, video, website... just find something that explains the reasons why they are doing what they're doing.

A: At dinner parties, are you the default bartender? Do you have to mix drinks even when it's not your party?
L: I'm definitely a default bartender, but usually parties are a collective effort with chef friends. I do get phone calls for advice - from the deck, from the bar, from the liquor store - and I am a go-to guy for some friends. I don't mind, though, it's an honour and I absolutely love it. Behind 3 feet of bar, I'm happiest. The coolest thing about what we bartenders and mixologists do is that everyone wants to be around you, because it looks like such a fun job. Not all jobs are like that! I don't walk into a lawyer's office and feel that way. Just saying.


Lorne Caborn: On Mixology, Captain Morgan, Tall Ships, and You
Photo by Megan Chandler. Used with permission.


A: Is mixology more an art or science, then?
L: The passionate person in me, the romantic in me, and my mom (an artist) in me thinks of it as an art. The science is knowing what flavours compliment each other, the proper mixing proportions, and how to balance acidity with sweet, etc. The science is more from a designer, executive, or management standpoint. The person at the top knows and teaches the science, while the bartenders on the floor are the art. And sometimes people bridge both.

A: What’s distinctive about your drinks, then?
L: It's a little more intangible. I put my heart and soul in everything I make. The coolest thing about what I do is that I can change a person’s night, with my mood, my service, my drink. It's a powerful thing.

A: If you had to choose just one, what's your favourite backyard/patio/BBQ drink?
L: A classic Mojito – no variations – it’s my baby.

A: Ok, so you're on your deathbed: what drink do you request?L:. A nice, full bodied red wine. It would take longer to drink than a cocktail ;)


A: Any final words?
L: Visit the My NSLC website. It's an awesome resource. I don't think it's being used to its potential because people just aren’t aware it's there.
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Given it was 10:30 in the morning, that I had to be at work by 1, and that, to my knowledge, public intoxication is still illegal, conditions weren’t ideal for – erm – taste testing. Thankfully, Lorne had recently had a fancy-pants photo shoot, so he allowed me to share these lovely shots by photographer Megan Chandler with you.

Lorne Caborn: On Mixology, Captain Morgan, Tall Ships, and You
Photo by Megan Chandler. Used with permission.

Morgan Takes Manhattan
by Lorne Caborn


Ingredients
1 oz. of Captain Morgan Private Stock
.5 oz. sweet vermouth
Garnish with a cherry

Mix all ingredients in a shaker, strain into a martini glass. Another twist on a classic cocktail.

Lorne Caborn: On Mixology, Captain Morgan, Tall Ships, and You
Photo by Megan Chandler. Used with permission.

Morgan's Maritimer

by Lorne Caborn
Ingredients
1.5 oz. Captain Morgan Private Stock
3-4 strawberries
orange juice
lemon/lime soda

Muddle strawberries in a rocks glass, add Captain Morgan Private Stock and top with ice. Fill 3/4 with orange juice and finish with lemon lime soda (try 7UP or Sprite).

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Give these summery cocktails a try and let me know what you think! I know I'll be unearthing my inner mixologist this weekend and giving these inspired cocktails a try. Stay tuned!

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  • Written by Amiee White
  • Category: Food Je t'Aimee

Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

Spaghettini with Shrimp, Tomatoes, and Chile Crumbs

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 - Delicious components, but missing something, flavour-wise.

Funnily enough, I couldn't even find the cover recipe for this month's challenge with Jasmine of Cook That Book, which we both laughed off as my having a glass too many of wine one night. However, the next day, and the day after that, and the day after that, I was still having trouble. Jasmine sent me the page number and name of the recipe, which I located in the back of the magazine, but for the life of me, I couldn't figure out how she knew it was the cover recipe. My magazine cover said nothing about it! Finally, I just came out with it and asked her, at the risk of sounding ridiculous.
Turns out, the lovely people over at Food & Wine Magazine made more than one cover for the month of July! How many did they make? Who knows. But we do know they made at least two, which explains my confusion. It wasn't until Jasmine and I photographed our respective covers and emailed them to each other that my little mystery was solved!

THE TEST

The recipe for this month (as it turns out) was this Spaghettini with Shrimp, Tomatoes, and Chile Crumbs, by Chef Dan Kluger. It looked pretty, sounded delicious, and seemed simple enough. It was another one of those recipes where I only had to pick up a few of the ingredients. Excellent! That, and I love fresh, simple pasta dishes with light but flavourful sauces, so this was right up my alley.

First you roast some plum tomatoes (local grocer wasn't carrying them, so opted for cocktail size) in red wine vinegar and olive oil, season them, cool them, and grate them into a rustic sauce. Crisp some bread crumbs (I used Panko flakes) in a pan with lemon zest, crushed red pepper, and olive oil. Boil some pasta until al dente. Stir fry the shrimp and combine it with the pasta and some shredded basil. Garnish it with cherry tomatoes and the Panko mixture. Lovely!

Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

THE RESULTS

So how was it? A little underwhelming, I'm sorry to say. The shrimp were definitely a highlight: plump, juicy and and with a touch of heat from the red pepper. The Panko mixture was also a great addition, and one I'll likely use again and again. But there really was something missing. The pasta itself was a little on the dull side. The tomato sauce wasn't as zingy as I imagined it would be, though that probably has more to do with the quality of the tomatoes than the recipe. And the cherry tomatoes on top would have benefitted from being warmed in the pan, too, to get their flavours and juices going.

Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

That said, it certainly wasn't the worst way to spend a warm, sunny Sunday evening to myself, with Ethel the cat for company and Muddy Waters creating some atmosphere. And those shrimp really made up for a lot!

For wine, the recipe recommended an unoaked Chardonnay to pair with the acidity of the tomatoes, so this Townsend Jack from the Okanagan Valley, BC was recommended to me by the people over at Harvest Wines & Spirits. I wonder if Jasmine has ever tried this wine, or Kendall from Wine2Three? Admittedly, I think I prefer the oak - taste wise - but it did pair nice and lightly with the pasta.

Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

I'll head over to Cook That Book later today to see how Jasmine fared with this recipe. Maybe she had better luck with her tomato sauce? Or her pasta?
Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

Food Wine Magazine: July Cover Recipe

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NOTE
: If any of you would like to follow along with Jasmine and I and join in on the fun, we'd love to compare notes! So pick-up a copy of the latest issue of Food & Wine and get cooking. Be sure to send your comments and photos to  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
The mission of Food & Wine Magazine is to find the most exciting places, new experiences, emerging trends and sensations in the culinary and wine industries. From travel and entertaining to luxury and design, this magazine brings an energetic and stylish take on food and wine. For more information on Food & Wine Magazine, please visit www.foodandwine.com
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  • Written by Amiee White
  • Category: Food Je t'Aimee

Vibrant Beef Black Bean Burritos - with Cookin' Greens

As much as I love spending time in the kitchen, carefully preparing meals, life just doesn't afford me these kinds of days every day (or every week, for that matter!). I'm sure you know the feeling! We all need to rely on 'fast' food from time to time, but not the variety that conjures up images from Super Size Me.

Unless you're a guru in the ways of healthy eating, have your own veggie patch, or are blessed with a one of these fabulously creative minds who can think of endless possibilities, sometimes it's hard to find ways of eating both fast and well, especially when you're thinking and shopping on the fly. Usually the most convenient foods are, inconveniently, quite unhealthy. Prepackaged, deep-fried, jammed with preservatives, or far too many sugars or carbs, these are just some of the ways that 'fast' food is delivered to us.

Another problem? With just the two of us at home, I buy fresh produce that (more often than I'd care to admit) doesn't get used up before going bad. I could put spinach in pretty much everything, for example, because I find it's the most colourful and healthy addition to so many of our regular dishes. But no matter how many different ways I think of to use it (and use it up), without fail, some of the package ultimately gets sacrificed to the green bin gods.

Enter Cookin' Greens: A company who takes rich, vibrant greens at the peak of their freshness and freezes them for quick meal prep. Here is an excerpt from the material they sent me:

Cookin' Greens "are cut at the peak of their freshness. Our greens go from farm-to-freezer within 6 hours of harvest, locking in all of the goodness intended by Mother Nature. An innovative "quick-frozen" process captures the ultimate flavour and nutritional value found in our dark-leafy greens. Cookin’ Greens™ offers you a sensory journey that is luscious and earthy. So eat your greens and savour the wholesome flavours!"


Vibrant Beef Black Bean Burritos - with Cookin' Greens

I was lucky enough to score some vouchers to try their products - disclaimer alert - but can honestly say I will be buying their products again, and often. They solve the problem of fast; they solve the problem of healthy; they solve the problem of wastage. Three massive wins in my book.

I found my bag of Cookin' Greens at Pete's Frootique in Bedford. They were only carrying one kind - Designer's Mix - so I grabbed my loot and went on my merry way, happy with its delicious mix of collards, rapini, spinach, yellow beans, and onion.

Greens are so versatile, they can go in just about anything: in salads, in pastas, on pizzas, in rice, in grains, in casseroles... there are truly few dishes where you couldn't find some way of sneaking in some greens. I probably wouldn't want any in my Apple Pie, though. Just saying.

(Brings to mind "Pie. Seaweed Pie." Anyone on the East Coast remember that old Maple Leaf commercial?)

In any case, I saw a great recipe for Black Bean Burritos on the Cookin' Greens website, and given I'd had hankering for some over the past few weeks, I decided to halve and adapt their recipe to include some of my own favourite ingredients. Being meat-lovers, yes, we opted for the addition of lean, ground beef. Without the meat, however, they would have been perfectly stuffed and hearty on their own.

Like with many things frozen, you need to watch out for the water content coming from the greens as they thaw and cook in your pan, so just account for that extra bit of liquid in whatever dish you're using them in. For example, I omitted the stock from the original version of the recipe below, because I found there was already sufficient liquid and flavour in the pan.



Vibrant Beef Black Bean Burritos - with Cookin' Greens

Vibrant Beef & Black Bean Burritos

Adapted from Cookin' Greens

Ingredients
1 tbsp olive oil
2 large sized cloves garlic, minced
1/2 medium sized red onion, thinly sliced
1 cup Cookin’ Greens - I used Designer's Mix
1/2 red pepper, thinly sliced
1/2 cup mushrooms, thinly sliced
1 Tbsp lime juice
1 Tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped
2 tsp chili powder
1 tsp ground cumin and dried oregano
1/2 a 14oz can black beans
1/2 cup corn kernels
4 8-inch flour tortillas
1 cup old Cheddar cheese, shredded
1 cup salsa

Method

In a large skillet heat olive oil over medium heat. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Add red onion and cook for 5 minutes until softened. Add any Cookin’ Greens product of your choice and incorporate. Sauté until soft, for 5 more minutes. Add red pepper and mushrooms; continue cooking for another 5 minutes.

Stir lime juice, cilantro, chili powder, cumin and oregano into sautéed vegetables. Cook another 3 minutes. Stir in beans and corn and cook, stirring until heated through about 3 minutes.

In another skillet over medium heat, warm tortilla for 2 minutes, turning once.

Place ½ cup of filling down centre of tortilla. Sprinkle with 2 tbsp cheese and 1 tbsp salsa. Fold up bottom and top edges in. Fold sides over filling. Repeat with remaining tortillas and filling. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Add extra cheese and salsa over tortillas.

Bake in preheated 300F oven for 10 minutes.

Yields: 4 servings.


Vibrant Beef Black Bean Burritos - with Cookin' Greens
How's that for vibrant!

Vibrant Beef Black Bean Burritos - with Cookin' Greens
Not the greatest shot, as I was too busy stuffing my face. These were delicious!

I used  the leftover black beans, corn, and Designer's Mix the next night in one of my very favourite throw-together dinners: Tuna Farfalle with Cherry Tomatoes, Cracked Pepper and Parmesan. 

Vibrant Beef Black Bean Burritos - with Cookin' Greens

Vibrant Beef Black Bean Burritos - with Cookin' Greens
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Visit the Cookin' Greens website for more great recipes and product information! 

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