• Category: SmartCity

Immigrants Strengthen the Local Economy

I remember, when I first settled in Halifax as a permanent resident, someone mentioned that it would be great if Halifax had a more diverse flavour.... I  realized that this person meant the cultural flavour! Since I was new to the city I didn’t really have much to say in response. Today, after having lived in Halifax for several years, I would have something to say.. I would tell this person that Halifax is becoming more diverse, and is growing in flavours!


The next time you are in and around the downtown area look out for the increasing number of restaurants and cafes opened by immigrants from different parts of the world.  Let’s start with The Hamachi Group which now has several restaurants in the Halifax area.   Let’s then continue our tour to Pete’s Frootique with its cornucopia of food from the Caribbean, Asian and Middle Eastern countries and then of course from Pete’s home country of England. Are you feeling hungry?


Ok, then let’s walk over to B-Well Sushi Cafe located on Quinpool Ave for some Japanese cuisine at a Japanese-cafe-style.  If Haligonians want to experience something spicier with a Latin flavour then how about Cafe Aroma Latino on the corner of North and Agricola. Here you will find a good selection of traditional food from different Central and South American countries, and enjoy a delicious dish while listening to some salsa music. The flavour continues around the city with Greek, Lebanese, Brazilian, Jamaican, Turkish, Indian, Thai, Italian, Mexican and many other ethnic restaurants.


Aside from restaurants and cafés, immigrant entrepreneurs have also strengthened the city’s economy by offering a variety of services in sectors such as construction. Many of the properties in The Ravines of Bedford South were developed by Cresco which is owned by an immigrant. Other services offered by immigrants include: Cleaning Services, Accounting, Translation, Real State, Finance, Fashion, IT Service, Health, Tailor Service, Import/Export, Communications, Landscape, Photography, Beauty/Wellness, Transportation, Education and Automotive, among others.  Immigrant Settlement and Integration Services (ISIS) offers a business directory (currently being updated) that demonstrates the diverse range of immigrant owned businesses in Halifax and the rest of the province.


There is a common myth that immigrants take jobs from locals. The reality is very different and it’s time to dispel that myth. The more than 200 small and medium-sized businesses established in Halifax by immigrants demonstrate that immigrant entrepreneurs actually create jobs for themselves and locals. They make an enormous contribution to our economy and community every day and there are many stories that demonstrate this success.   


I am the Immigration Employer Support Coordinator at the Greater Halifax Partnership and if you are an immigrant entrepreneur and are considering bringing a family member from your home country to work in your business, you can contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   I can provide you with all the information you need to start the process.

Margie_immigrationworks

Margie Casallas

As a recent immigrant to Canada, Margie understands the unique skills and perspectives that immigrants bring to Nova Scotia. She has eight years of experience in the private sector and is currently doing an Executive MBA at Saint Mary’s University. Margie enjoys traveling and has experienced living in different countries.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SmartcityBlog/~3/kxXpbh2yj5Q/immigrants-stregthens-the-local-economy.html

  • Category: SmartCity

Immigrants Stregthens the Local Economy

I remember, when I first settled in Halifax as a permanent resident, someone mentioned that it would be great if Halifax had a more diverse flavour.... I  realized that this person meant the cultural flavour! Since I was new to the city I didn’t really have much to say in response. Today, after having lived in Halifax for several years, I would have something to say.. I would tell this person that Halifax is becoming more diverse, and is growing in flavours!


The next time you are in and around the downtown area look out for the increasing number of restaurants and cafes opened by immigrants from different parts of the world.  Let’s start with The Hamachi Group which now has several restaurants in the Halifax area.   Let’s then continue our tour to Pete’s Frootique with its cornucopia of food from the Caribbean, Asian and Middle Eastern countries and then of course from Pete’s home country of England. Are you feeling hungry?


Ok, then let’s walk over to B-Well Sushi Cafe located on Quinpool Ave for some Japanese cuisine at a Japanese-cafe-style.  If Haligonians want to experience something spicier with a Latin flavour then how about Cafe Aroma Latino on the corner of North and Agricola. Here you will find a good selection of traditional food from different Central and South American countries, and enjoy a delicious dish while listening to some salsa music. The flavour continues around the city with Greek, Lebanese, Brazilian, Jamaican, Turkish, Indian, Thai, Italian, Mexican and many other ethnic restaurants.


Aside from restaurants and cafés, immigrant entrepreneurs have also strengthened the city’s economy by offering a variety of services in sectors such as construction. Many of the properties in The Ravines of Bedford South were developed by Cresco which is owned by an immigrant. Other services offered by immigrants include: Cleaning Services, Accounting, Translation, Real State, Finance, Fashion, IT Service, Health, Tailor Service, Import/Export, Communications, Landscape, Photography, Beauty/Wellness, Transportation, Education and Automotive, among others.  Immigrant Settlement and Integration Services (ISIS) offers a business directory (currently being updated) that demonstrates the diverse range of immigrant owned businesses in Halifax and the rest of the province.


There is a common myth that immigrants take jobs from locals. The reality is very different and it’s time to dispel that myth. The more than 200 small and medium-sized businesses established in Halifax by immigrants demonstrate that immigrant entrepreneurs actually create jobs for themselves and locals. They make an enormous contribution to our economy and community every day and there are many stories that demonstrate this success.   


I am the Immigration Employer Support Coordinator at the Greater Halifax Partnership and if you are an immigrant entrepreneur and are considering bringing a family member from your home country to work in your business, you can contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   I can provide you with all the information you need to start the process.

Margie_immigrationworks

Margie Casallas

As a recent immigrant to Canada, Margie understands the unique skills and perspectives that immigrants bring to Nova Scotia. She has eight years of experience in the private sector and is currently doing an Executive MBA at Saint Mary’s University. Margie enjoys traveling and has experienced living in different countries.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SmartcityBlog/~3/kxXpbh2yj5Q/immigrants-stregthens-the-local-economy.html

  • Category: SmartCity

Making Dreams a Reality

We all have dreams when we’re young. Some people want to become a movie star; some wish to be an Olympic champion; while others dream about becoming the Prime Minister.  When I was 14, my dream was to be happy and financially successful: to have a big job, own a big house, drive a fancy car, and the list can go on and on.

But for those who fail to plan for the future, dreams remain just that...dreams.


On March 29th, four staff from the Partnership including President and CEO Paul Kent took part in Junior Achievement's Economics for Success Program, helping grade 9 students at Duncan MacMillan High School in Sheet Harbour plan for their future.

We shared our experience and business expertise to help them understand important concepts and explore their personal finance, education and career options.  Careful not to “burst their bubble”, we provided practical planning tips and an idea of the skills needed to have a career and be financially independent and successful. 

It was wonderful to spend a morning with dynamic and promising students. They were engaged and eager to learn how making the right choices could help them achieve their goals. Personally, I had a lot of fun. It made me think back to when I was 14 and how great it would have been to have someone share advice and information about planning for my future.
 
I’m really looking forward to participating again next year in this valuable program.

For more information about Junior Achievement’s programs and services in Nova Scotia, please visit http://nova-scotia.jacan.org/.

Jackiespic1 Jackie Guo is the Coordinator of International MBA Student Connector Program. In addition to his work at the Partnership, Jackie is an active volunteer for Halifax United Way.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SmartcityBlog/~3/Q31MDxisGJ4/from-thinking-big-to-thinking-reality.html

  • Category: SmartCity

From Thinking Big to Thinking Reality

We all had dreams when we were young. Some people wanted to become a movie star, some wished to become an Olympic champion, while some dreamed to become the Prime Minister... when I was 14, my dream was to be happy and financially successful: have a big job, own a big house, drive a fancy car, and the list can go on and on...

For many, dreams are just dreams without good planning.

On March 29th, four staff from the Partnership, including President and CEO Paul Kent, took part in Junior Achievement's  Economic for Success Program, helping grade 9 students at Duncan MacMillan High School in Sheet Harbour to plan for their future success. It is the second time that the Partnership helped students plan for their future through Junior Achievement. 

It was wonderful to spend a morning with dynamic and promising students to show them what success is and how the right choices can help them to get there. We made sure to not “burst their bubble” in their dreams for the future so we gave them practical planning tips and an idea of the skills needed to be able to have a career and great lifestyle.

The grade 9 students at Duncan MacMillan were engaging and eager to learn, and I had so much fun. It made me think back to when I was 14 and how, through time, life has a way of balancing itself and how great it would’ve been to have 4 people talk to me about planning for my future.

I’ll do it again next year.

More info:
The Junior Achievement Economics for Success Program helps middle school students explore their personal finance and education and career options based on their skills, interests, and values.  Volunteers share their business expertise and experience to help students understand essential concepts and learn required skills to be financially independent and economically successful through fun activities.

For more information about Junior Achievement’s programs and services in Nova Scotia, please visit http://nova-scotia.jacan.org/.

Jackiespic1 Jackie Guo is the Coordinator of International MBA Student Connector Program. In addition to his work at the Partnership, Jackie is an active volunteer for Halifax United Way.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SmartcityBlog/~3/Q31MDxisGJ4/from-thinking-big-to-thinking-reality.html

  • Category: SmartCity

SmartCity Business Show: Episode 7 in Review

Okay, okay. So there weren’t any explosions like I’d suggested in my last blog, but Craig did spend six (hmmm) hours testing out a Helly Hansen survival suit in an industrial kiddie pool.

This episode, lucky number seven, reminded me of just how lucky we are here in Halifax. We are located footsteps from the Atlantic Ocean, and have a harbour deep enough to handle pretty much anything we want to import or export.

Haligonia-title-still.jpg_200

We also have the talent and expertise here to make clothing and sportswear for world-class sailors, skiers and adventurers. Helly Hansen Canada Ltd., led by President Dan Clarke, employs 125 people at its factory. This means there are no “Helly-bots” doing the work. Real people are doing everything from cutting the fabric, putting in the last zipper, and performing safety and quality tests on every product they make.

This series continues to be an eye-opener for me. It’s great to see how we are capitalizing on our natural assets and talented people to create employment and prosperity in Halifax.

 

Maegblogpic2 Maeghan Murphy, Marketing & Communications Co-op Student

Maeghan is with the Partnership on a four month work-term. She is in her third year of Public Relations at Mount Saint Vincent University and had her first taste of the working world on her work-term with Nova Scotia Power this summer. Although she'll always be a Cape Bretoner at heart, Maeghan is happy to now call Halifax her home.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SmartcityBlog/~3/u3nupRn7iG8/smartcity-business-show-episode-7-in-review-.html

  • Category: SmartCity

SmartCity Episode 7: Helly Hansen

Video: SmartCity visits the well hidden Helly Hansen Canada facility here in Halifax.  Here they design, test and export all their work wear clothing and items. Craig Layton chats to CMA and President Dan Clarke who has a few surprises up his sleeve for Craig in the Research and Development testing area.

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