The Reader / Home

A blog from the Readers' Services staff at Halifax Public Libraries.
  • Category: The Reader

2012 BMO Winterset Award


Writer and actor Andy Jones has been awarded the 2012 BMO Winterset Award for his book Jack and Mary in the Land of Thieves. (M)
2012 BMO Winterset Award The BMO Winterset Award has been given annually to a Newfoundland and Labrador author (native born or resident to the province) to celebrate excellence in local writing. All forms of writing are considered - novels, poetry, drama, children's literature. The BMO Winterset Award is in memory of Newfoundland writer Sandra Fraser Gwyn, a prize-winning journalist.
In Jack and Mary in the Land of Thieves "Award-winning storyteller Andy Jones and acclaimed illustrator Darka Erdelji are back with another whimsical, wise, and witty 'Jack tale' -- the third in their on-going series. Jack and Mary in the Land of Thieves finds Jack, that everyman of folktales, married to his sweetheart Mary, the best woman ever born and a mighty fine baker to boot. Their lives are as happy and successful as can be, until an underhanded sea captain and Jack's own bragging get the better of our hero. Jack is sent to work on Slave Islands, and Mary is turned out of house and home. But Mary is resolute and resourceful, and has plans to find Jack and restore their fortunes. With a hidden key, a storm at sea, and a singing mynah bird named Baxter who carries more than his share of tunes, Jack and Mary in the Land of Thieves will delight youngsters and oldsters alike." publisher 
This year's finalists included Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders (M) by Greg Malone and Russell Wangersky's Whirl Away. (M)
  ...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

4 Fiction Titles to look for in April

Four new April fiction releases to pique your interest:
The Mothers (M)
by Jennifer Gilmore
4 Fiction Titles to look for in April "Poignant, raw, and insightful, Jennifer Gilmore’s third novel is an unforgettable story of love, family, and motherhood. With a “voice [that is] at turns wise and barbed with sharp humor” (Vanity Fair), Gilmore lays bare the story of one couple’s ardent desire for a child and their emotional journey through adoption.
4 Fiction Titles to look for in April
Photo: Pedro Barbeito
Jesse and Ramon are a loving couple, but after years spent unsuccessfully trying to get pregnant, they turn to adoption, relieved to think that once they navigate the bureaucratic path to parent-hood they will have a happy ending. But nothing has prepared them for the labyrinthine process—for the many training sessions and approvals; for the constant advice from friends, strangers, and “experts”; for the birthmothers who contact them but don’t ultimately choose them; or even, most shockingly, for the women who call claiming they’ve chosen Jesse and Ramon but who turn out never to have been pregnant in the first place.
Jennifer Gilmore’s eloquence about the human heart—its frailties and complexities—and her razor-sharp observations about race, class, culture, and changing family dynamics are spectacularly combined in this powerful novel. Suffused with passion and fury, The Mothers is a taut, gripping, and satisfying book that will stay with readers long after they turn the last page." - Publisher

Palace of Curiosities (M)
by Rosie Garland
4 Fiction Titles to look for in April "Before Eve is born, her mother goes to the circus. She buys a penny twist of coloured sugar and settles down to watch the heart-stopping main attraction: a lion, billed as a monster from the savage heart of Africa, forged in the heat of a merciless sun. Mama swears she hears the lion sigh, just before it leaps...and when Eve is born, the story goes, she didn′t cry - she meowed and licked her paws.
4 Fiction Titles to look for in April When Abel is pulled from the stinking Thames, the mudlarks are sure he is long dead. As they search his pockets to divvy up the treasure, his eyes crack open and he coughs up a stream of black water. But how has he survived a week in that thick stew of human waste?
Cast out by Victorian society, Eve and Abel find succour from an unlikely source. They will become The Lion Faced Girl and The Flayed Man, star performers in Professor Josiah Arroner′s Palace of Curiosities. And there begins a journey that will entwine their fates forever.

The Hungry Ghosts  (M)
by Shyam Selvadurai
In Buddhist myth, the dead may be reborn as "hungry ghosts"—spirits with stomach so large they can never be full—if they have desired too much during their lives. It is the duty of the living relatives to free those doomed to this fate by doing kind deeds and creating good karma. In Shyam Selvadurai’s sweeping new novel, his first in more than a decade, he creates an unforgettable ghost, a powerful Sri Lankan matriarch whose wily ways, insatiable longing for land, houses, money and control, and tragic blindness to the human needs of those around her parallels the volatile political situation of her war-torn country.
4 Fiction Titles to look for in April The novel centres around Shivan Rassiah, the beloved grandson, who is of mixed Tamil and Sinhalese lineage, and who also—to his grandmother’s dismay—grows from beautiful boy to striking gay man. As the novel opens in the present day, Shivan, now living in Canada, is preparing to travel back to Colombo, Sri Lanka, to rescue his elderly and ailing grandmother, to remove her from the home—now fallen into disrepair—that is her pride, and bring her to Toronto to live our her final days. But throughout the night and into the early morning hours of his departure, Shivan grapples with his own insatiable hunger and is haunted by unrelenting ghosts of his own creation.
The Hungry Ghosts is a beautifully written, dazzling story of family, wealth and the long reach of the past. It shows how racial, political and sexual differences can tear apart both a country and the human heart—not just once, but many times, until the ghosts are fed and freed.." - Publisher
Just Pretending (M)
by Lisa Bird-Wilson
"From one of Canada's most exciting new Metis voices comes a book whose recurring themes include the complexities of identity, belonging/not belonging, Aboriginal adoption, loss and abandonment, regret and insecurity.
4 Fiction Titles to look for in April A deadbeat dad tries to reconnect with his daughter after 22 years away. A selfish poet has been scarred by an upbringing that leaves him emotionally distant from his children and spouse. A pot-smoking middle-aged man undertakes a modest quest for meaning following a brush with mortality. A fourteen-year-old girl struggles to come to terms with her feelings of abandonment.
The characters are often fragile, sometimes unlikeable, but ultimately can be identified or sympathized with. At the centre of the stories are notions of identity and belonging, and the complex relationships between children and parents, both those who are real and those who are just pretending." - Publisher
...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

Autism in Fiction


April is Autism Awareness month.
In support of the initiative to raise awareness, I offer up three recent novels dealing the theme of autism.  Although we provide many non-fiction titles on the topic, the power of fiction to inform should not be overlooked.

Me, Who Dove into the Heart of the World : a novel (M)
by Sabina Berman ; translated by Lisa Dillman
Autism in Fiction "A transporting and brilliant novel narrated by an unforgettable woman: Karen Nieto, an autistic savant whose idiosyncrasies prove her greatest gifts. As intimate as it is profound, and as clear-eyed as it is warmhearted, Me, Who Dove into the Heart of the World marks an extraordinary debut by the award-winning Mexican playwright, journalist, and poet Sabina Berman.
Karen Nieto passed her earliest years as a feral child, left alone to wander the vast beach property near her family's failing tuna cannery. But when her aunt Isabelle comes to Mexico to take over the family business, she discovers a real girl amidst the squalor. So begins a miraculous journey for autistic savant Karen, who finds freedom not only in the love and patient instruction of her aunt but eventually at the bottom of the ocean swimming among the creatures of the sea. Despite how far she's come, Karen remains defined by the things she can't do—until her gifts with animals are finally put to good use at the family's fishery. Her plan is brilliant: Consolation Tuna will be the first humane tuna fishery on the planet. Greenpeace approves, fame and fortune follow, and Karen is swept on a global journey that explores how we live, what we eat, and how our lives can defy even our own wildest expectations.
Love Anthony : a novel (M)
by Lisa Genova
"I’m always hearing about how my brain doesn’t work right…But it doesn’t feel broken to me.
Autism in Fiction Olivia Donatelli’s dream of a “normal” life shattered when her son, Anthony, was diagnosed with autism at age three. He didn’t speak. He hated to be touched. He almost never made eye contact. And just as Olivia was starting to realize that happiness and autism could coexist, Anthony was gone. Now she’s alone on Nantucket, desperate to find meaning in her son’s short life, when a chance encounter with another woman brings Anthony alive again in a most unexpected way.
In a warm, deeply human story reminiscent of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time and Daniel Isn’t Talking, New York Times bestselling author Lisa Genova offers us two unforgettable women on the verge of change and the irrepressible young boy with autism whose unique wisdom helps them both find the courage to move on."  -Publisher
The Children of Witches (M)
by Sherri Smith
Autism in Fiction "Married to a drunken tavern-keeper, Anna Wirth takes comfort in her two sons, hard-working Konrad and the beautiful, flaxen-haired Manfred, who sings like an angel and who, some say, has been touched by God. But at the same time, Anna is desperate to prevent people finding out the truth about her younger son. That he is not like other children: he does not communicate, doesn't make eye contact, lives in his own private world, obsessed with collecting and arranging piles of leaves and stones.
When rumours of witchcraft sweep through the town, Manfred is seized by those who would use him to pursue their own agenda. As innocent townsfolk are accused, a climate of fear prevails. No one is safe - and at the centre of the terror is Anna's own son. As the death toll mouns, Anna realizes there is only one way to stop the madness. But can she act against a mother's deepest instincts?" - Publisher ...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

4 Nonfiction Titles to Look for in April


April is here and hopefully with it a bit of spring like weather. I've got a lot of yard work to do so there's no way I'm fitting in quite as much reading this month: here's just four titles that are on my radar for April.
4 Nonfiction Titles to Look for in April In the City of Bikes (M) by Pete Jordan (April 16). A few years ago, friends of mine who spent a brief stint living in Amsterdam, marvelled online about how, when time came for them to move home, they biked to the airport on a dedicated bike trail.  Pete Jordan is an American author (his previous book is Dishwasher: One Man's Quest to Wash Dishes in All Fifty States) who similarly marvelled at Amsterdam's bike culture and infrastructure. In the City of Bikes is part history, part memoir "that tells the story of [the author's] love affair with Amsterdam, the city of bikes, all the while unfolding an unknown history of the city's cycling, from the craze of the 1890s, through the Nazi occupation, to the bike-centric culture adored by the world today."
4 Nonfiction Titles to Look for in April Gulp: adventures on the alimentary canal (M) by Mary Roach (April 16). Prolific author Roach has a reputation for giving readers informed and interesting microhistories on somewhat unconventional topics including corpses (Stiff : the Curious Lives of Human Cadavers), life-after-death (Spook : Science Tackles the Afterlife) and life without gravity (Packing for Mars : the Curious Science of Life in the Void). In this latest she explores our digestive tracts. The Washington Post has called Roach "America’s funniest science writer".
4 Nonfiction Titles to Look for in April Time Reborn: from the crisis in physics to the future of the universe (M) by Lee Smolin (April 23). "Since the ancients, physicists have argued that time is not real, that we may think we experience time passing but it's just a human illusion in a timeless universe operating on predetermined laws. Lee brilliantly shows how this thinking came about from our deep need for stability and the eternal, but that indeed time may be the only thing that is real." American physicist Smolin is a professor at the University of Waterloo and has previously penned the somewhat controversial in science circles The Trouble With Physics: the rise of string theory, the fall of a science, and what comes next.

4 Nonfiction Titles to Look for in April The Enlightenment: and why it still matters (M) by Anthony Pagden (April 23).  I guess I'm feeling a bit intellectual this month, because here's another new release that's a little bit academic, this one looking at history. "One of our most renowned and brilliant historians takes a fresh look at the revolutionary intellectual movement that laid the foundation for the modern world. Liberty and equality. Human rights. Freedom of thought and expression. Belief in reason and progress. The value of scientific inquiry. These are just some of the ideas that were conceived and developed during the Enlightenment, and which changed forever the intellectual landscape of the Western world. Spanning hundreds of years of history, Anthony Pagden traces the origins of this seminal movement, showing how Enlightenment concepts directly influenced modern culture, making possible a secular, tolerant, and, above all, cosmopolitan world... A clear and compelling explanation of the philosophical underpinnings of the modern world, The Enlightenment is a scintillating portrait of a period, a critical moment in history, and a revolution in thought that continues to this day."...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

Murder where?


Murder in a Basket (M)
by Amanda Flower.
Murder where? Gotta love a chocolate coloured labradoodle with a two million dollar trust fund. Librarian India Hayes investigates the murder of basket weaver Tess Lepcheck. Maybe Tess was murdered for her dog's trust fund? India uses her researching skills to make connections with an unsolved case. A humorous cozy by an Agatha Award nominee.
Murder in a Cathedral (M)
by Ruth Dudley Edwards.
Murder where? Robert Amiss and the outspoken Baroness Troutbeck investigate an apparent suicide at Westonbury Cathedral. The new American deacon is intolerant of a lesbian clergy and moves the church along fundamentalist lines. Divisions erupt and the violence becomes deadly.
Murder in a Good Cause (M)
by Medora Sale.
Murder where? Inspector John Sanders investigates the murder of singer / actress Clara von Hohenkammer in her home in Toronto. Before her sudden death during a dramatic reading she had argued with virtually her whole family causing  Sanders to suspect her whole family in addition to a possible theft ring.
Murder in Abbot's Folly (M)
by Amy Myers.
Murder where? Peter and Georgia Marsh, a father and daughter investigative team, are drawn to a murder that took place in an eighteenth century folly. They solve cold case murders and then publish books about them. The site of the folly is an old mansion whose present owner is killed and the Marsh duo investigate the connection to the historical murder.
Murder in Alphabet City (M)
by Lee Harris.
Murder where? In Manhattan Jane Bauer, detective first grade, works on a cold case involving an apparent suicide who starved to death in his own apartment. The victim's well-connected sister insists that the case be re-examined and Bauer finds another suicide that may well be connected.
Murder in Central Park (M)
by Michael Jahn.
Murder where? The body of a computer genius is found floating in a pond in Central Park. Detective Bill Donovan comes across the corpse after spending a night in a tree house with an interest in observing intelligent crows. An entertaining murder mystery with lots of tidbits about Central Park.
Murder in Gotham (M
 by Isidore Haiblum.
Murder where? Private detective Morris Weiss is the investigator of choice for a woman whose husband is missing in the Lower Eastside of New York due to Weiss' intimate knowledge of the New York gangland. This is a fun, fast-paced mystery series written in the style of 1950's hard-boiled detective novels.
Murder in Mesopotamia (M
by Agatha Christie.
Murder where? Hercule Poirot visits an archaeological dig in Mesopotamia or modern day Iraq. Amy Leatheran has been hired as a nurse to care for the wife of the leader of the expedition. When the wife is found murdered, Nurse Leatheran becomes a susperct. Poirot investigates....

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

The John W. Dafoe Book Prize

The John W. Dafoe Book Prize This annual prize is awarded by the J. W. Dafoe Foundation of Winnipeg for the best book on Canada, Canadians and/or Canada’s place in the world” published in the previous calendar year.
It commemorates long-time Winnipeg Free Press editor John W. Dafoe.
The 2013 finalists are:

The John W. Dafoe Book Prize Let the Eastern Bastards Freeze in the Dark: the West versus the rest since Confederation (M
by Mary Janigan
Warrior Nation: rebranding Canada in an age of anxiety  (M)
by Ian McKay and Jamie Swift
The John W. Dafoe Book Prize What We Talk About When We Talk About War  (M)
by Noah Richer
Chronic Condition: why Canada’s health care system needs to be dragged into the 21st Century (M)
by Jeffrey Simpson
Secret Service: political policing in Canada from the Fenians to Fortress America (ILL)
by Reg Whitaker, Gregory S. Kealey and Andrew Parnaby.

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

Cue the Easter Bunny - 3 wisecracking mysteries


Cue the Easter Bunny (M)
by Liz Evans
Cue the Easter Bunny - 3 wisecracking mysteries "Things get hopping for P.I. Grace Smith when she dons a bunny outfit to earn a little extra money handing out promotional items. While she's on the job, one of Grace's business cards falls into the hands of Della, a woman whose son, actor Jonathon Black, has been receiving threatening letters. Jonathon is married to television soap star Clemency Courtney, and Grace gets her foot in their door by telling the couple that Della has hired her to be a gardener for their estate. Grace, of course, knows nothing about plants (except how to cut them down), and the closer she gets to catching the villain, the worse the landscaping looks. A witty, wisecracking heroine who manages to bungle her way to solving the case; colorful characters; hilarious, often improbable situations; and snappy dialog all add up to a very fun read. This is the sixth (after Sick as a Parrot) title in the "PI Grace Smith Investigations" series for a writer called the British Janet Evanovich. Though this book works as a standalone, libraries should also consider the other books in the series. Highly recommended." -Library Journal
Easter Bunny Murder (M)
by Leslie Meier
Cue the Easter Bunny - 3 wisecracking mysteries "At the start of Meier's delightful 19th Lucy Stone mystery (after 2012's Chocolate Covered Murder), the families gathered outside elderly Vivian Van Vorst's mansion, Pine Point, in rural Tinker's Cove, Maine, for VV's annual Easter egg hunt are puzzled to find the gates closed. Then the Easter Bunny emerges from the house, runs clumsily toward the gates, and collapses on the ground. The Easter Bunny-VV's grandson, Van Vorst Duff-dies on the way to the hospital. VV had always been generous with her wealth, but Lucy, part-time reporter for the local newspaper, learns that she has been reclusive recently and funds may have been tight. Did some envious family member off Duff because he was VV's heir, or did he die of natural causes? If it's murder, is money or revenge the motive? Cozy fans will enjoy Lucy's hunt for the truth" - Publisher Weekly
Death and the Easter Bunny : a mystery (M)
by Linda Berry
Cue the Easter Bunny - 3 wisecracking mysteries "On a spring night in Ogeechee, Georgia, Trudy Roundtree, the town's first woman police officer, arrives at a fire and finds the former son-in-law of the most powerful man in town dead, apparently from smoke inhalation. The autopsy reveals that Reed Ritter was murdered. Because the rest of the police force, including Trudy's cousin, the chief of police, is hospitalized from sitting in poison oak on a drug stakeout, Trudy is left to find Ritter's killer in a thicket of suspects. This very strong first novel has lively writing and dialogue, realistic characters, and a surprising mystery. Berry balances wisecracking dialogue and funny situations with poignant insights on children, parents, and families. Readers of Joan Hess' wildly popular Maggody novels will be interested in this title, as will fans of such lesser-known southern mysteries as Jody Jaffe's In Colt Blood and Toni Kelner's Tight as a Tick." -Booklist...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

3 Canadian Writers with Buzz


3 Canadian Writers with Buzz
Photo © Christy Ann Conlin

Madeleine Thien (M) hit the news this month in relation to the Amazon.ca First Novel Award. Ms Thien resigned as a juror for the award in protest of how the award misrepresented the jurors' role. For full details, see her erudite opinion piece On Transparency in the National Post.
~~~
3 Canadian Writers with Buzz Creating loads of canlit buzz is Toronto novelist Shelia Heti's inclusion on the long list for the UK's prestigious Women's Prize for Fiction (formerly the Orange Prize).
How Should a Person Be? (M)
by Shelia Heti
3 Canadian Writers with Buzz "In this innovative novel, Heti invites her readers to share one woman's intensive pursuit of meaning and purpose in life. Through Sheila, who's obsessed with self-reflection, we witness the raw and sometimes painful experience of searching for the truth of one's soul. Sheila is recently divorced, and her friendships, particularly that with painter Margaux, are central to this quest for self-realization; she relies on the desires and expectations of others to determine her own worth. Interestingly, for a somewhat confused character working through the process of self-discovery, Sheila is capable of relaying sharp insights into human nature and complex emotion."- Library Journal
~~~
3 Canadian Writers with Buzz Douglas Glover's new book on writing, Attack of the Copula Spiders: and other essays on writing (M) has created quite a buzz of discussion among writers around the world. A blog post gone viral by jpon of The Los Angeles Review highlighted Glover's ideas to the larger literary world in a blog post titled "The Case of the Copula Overdose, or, Why I’ll Never Write (or Read) the Same Way Again."
3 Canadian Writers with Buzz ...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

The Life of Jesus on e-Books


Jesus of Nazareth: from the baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration
by Pope Benedict XVI
The Life of Jesus on e-Books "This book is . . . my personal search 'for the face of the Lord.'" --Benedict XVI
"In this bold, momentous work, the Pope--in his first book written as Benedict XVI--seeks to salvage the person of Jesus from recent "popular" depictions and to restore Jesus' true identity as discovered in the Gospels. Through his brilliance as a theologian and his personal conviction as a believer, the Pope shares a rich, compelling, flesh-and-blood portrait of Jesus and incites us to encounter, face-to-face, the central figure of the Christian faith." - publisher
How Jesus Became Christian
by Barrie Wilson
The Life of Jesus on e-Books "In How Jesus Became Christian, Barrie Wilson Ph.D. confronts one of the simplest—yet undiscovered—questions of religious history: How did a young, well-respected rabbi become the head of a cult that bore his name, espoused a philosophy he wouldn’t wholly understand, and possessed a clear streak of anti-Semitism that has sparked hatred against the generations of Jews who followed him? Vividly recreating the Hellenistic world into which Jesus was born, Wilson looks at the rivalry of the ”Jesus movement”, informed by Matthew and adhering to Torah worship, and the “Christ movement,“ headed by Paul which shunned Torah. Suggesting that Paul’s movement was not rooted in the teachings of historical Jesus, but a mystical vision of Christ, he further proposes Paul founded the new religion through anti-semitic propaganda, crushing the Jesus Movement.
Sure to be controversial, this is an exciting, well-written popular religious history that cuts to the heart of the differences between Christianity and Judaism. How Jesus Became Christian looks at how one of the world’s great religions prospered and grew at the cost of another and focuses on one of the fundamental questions that goes to the heart of way millions worship daily: Who was Jesus Christ --a Jew or a Christian?"- publisher
Did Jesus Exist?: the historical, non-religious argument for Jesus of Nazareth
by Bart D. Ehrman
The Life of Jesus on e-Books "In Did Jesus Exist? historian and Bible expert Bart Ehrman confronts the question, "Did Jesus exist at all?" Ehrman vigorously defends the historical Jesus, identifies the most historically reliable sources for best understanding Jesus’ mission and message, and offers a compelling portrait of the person at the heart of the Christian tradition.
Known as a master explainer with deep knowledge of the field, Bart Ehrman methodically demolishes both the scholarly and popular “mythicist” arguments against the existence of Jesus. Marshaling evidence from within the Bible and the wider historical record of the ancient world, Ehrman tackles the key issues that surround the mythologies associated with Jesus and the early Christian movement.
In Did Jesus Exist?: The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth, Ehrman establishes the criterion for any genuine historical investigation and provides a robust defense of the methods required to discover the Jesus of history." - publisher
...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

Staff Pick - Mercy Thompson Series by Patricia Briggs

Staff Pick - Mercy Thompson Series by Patricia Briggs I came across the first of Briggs' Mercy Thompson series (M) a few years ago and became a quick follower of Mercy Thompson, aka, the coyote shape-shifter. The series main character, Mercy, grew up amongst a werewolf pack, but runs her own life with a stubbornness that any independent woman would approve.

Staff Pick - Mercy Thompson Series by Patricia Briggs She has protection of the werewolves, makes friends with the vampires, and fights battles with fae magic from time to time. I read the first two books, Moon Calledand Blood Bound, and listened to the next four via audio. I didn't find a difference in how the story flowed with the different formats, and continued to want more, read more, know more.

Staff Pick - Mercy Thompson Series by Patricia Briggs I was so excited when I found out Briggs had written yet another Mercy Thompson book and placed Frost Burned on hold immediately. I was initially worried about the slow start to the latest book, but it picked up speed, held my attention, and kept me on the edge of my seat, and up quite late!

I am not a hardcore fantasy reader, but shape-shifters are my weakness. Add a little vamp and some witchery, and you have a great tale to spin, as Briggs clearly displays!

~Doreen


...

Read more

  • Category: The Reader

Journeying Through


Some might say that reading a book is like a journey. It's a nice metaphor for the process of reading, which is much like taking a virtual trip through someone else's experiences or imaginings. The authors of the following books really felt that their works represented a journey from one point to another -- they've all included the metaphor in the very title of their books. Looking for an adventure? Why not journey through one of these great books!

For the Love of Physics: from the end of the rainbow to the edge of time - a journey through the wonders of physics (M) by Walter Lewin and Warren Goldstein
Journeying Through I managed to make it through high school and university without even a basic Intro to Physics class. I've always felt like I missed out on something: though intimidating to the novice, physics also seems like a fascinating study that holds so many secrets to the world we know. Walter Lewin's path couldn't have been more different than mine and this book (as described by the library catalogue) is a"largely autobiographical account of the author's life as one who fell in love first with physics and then with teaching physics to students."
If that sounds a bit dry you should consider the following: "Universally praised for the remarkably fun, inventive, and often wacky ways in which Walter Lewin brings the joys of physics to life—from super-charging a tricycle with a fire extinguisher to risking his life by putting his head in the path of a swinging wrecking ball—For the Love of Physics takes readers on a marvelous journey, opening our eyes as never before to the amazing beauty and power of all that physics can reveal to us, from the coolest, weirdest features of the tiniest bits of matter, to the wonders of our everyday lives. "

From Pemmican to Poutine: a journey through Canada's culinary history (M) by Suman Roy and Brooke Ali
Journeying Through With all the focus on food in the media these days -- from celebrity chefs on cooking shows to local food movements and discussions of food security -- it's not surprising to stumble upon this book celebrating Canada's culinary history. Divided by region, it's part cookbook, part history book and contains not just pemmican and poutine, but fiddleheads, lobster rolls, maple syrup and many more Canadian delights.
The Last Great Ape: a journey through Africa and a fight for the heart of the continent (M) by Ofir Drori and David McDannald
Journeying Through The Last Great Ape is the name of an organization run by Ofir Drori that bills itself as the "first Wildlife Law Enforcement NGO in Africa". It supports not only the preservation of apes but of African animals and their habits in general. The book is part environmental commentary, part animal activism and part good old fashioned adventure: "The Last Great Ape is a story of the fight against extinction and the tragedy of endangered worlds, not just of animals but of people struggling to hold onto their culture. The book reveals the intense beauty and strife that exist side by side in Africa, and Ofir makes the case that activism and dedication to a cause are still relevant in a cynical modern world. This dramatic story is one of courage and hope and, most importantly, a search for meaning."
Rez Life: an Indian's journey through reservation life (M)
by David Treuer
Journeying Through The Idle No More movement in Canada has brought many of the issues and challenges facing First Nations People in Canada into the spotlight, Treuer's new memoir looks at similar issues south of our border. "Celebrated novelist David Treuer has gained a reputation for writing fiction that expands the horizons of Native American literature. In Rez Life, his first full-length work of nonfiction, Treuer brings a novelist's storytelling skill and an eye for detail to a complex and subtle examination of Native American reservation life, past and present.With authoritative research and reportage, Treuer illuminates misunderstood contemporary issues of sovereignty, treaty rights, and natural-resource conservation. He traces the waves of public policy that have disenfranchised and exploited Native Americans, exposing the tension that has marked the historical relationship between the United States government and the Native American population." This book would make good companion reading for those who have read or are waiting to read Thomas King's The Inconvenient Indian : a curious account of Native People in North America.
She Walks In Beauty: a woman's journey through poems (M)
by Caroline Kennedy
Journeying Through With April -- National Poetry Month -- approaching, it's time for me to start my annual obsession with the fact that I simply don't read enough poetry: this accessible collection may be a place to get an early jump if you feel the same way. "In She Walks in Beauty, Caroline Kennedy has once again marshaled the gifts of our greatest poets to pay a very personal tribute to the human experience, this time to the complex and fascinating subject of womanhood. Inspired by her own reflections on more than fifty years of life as a young girl, a woman, a wife, and a mother, She Walks in Beauty draws on poetry’s eloquent wisdom to ponder the many joys and challenges of being a woman. Kennedy has divided the collection into sections that signify to her the most notable milestones, passages, and universal experiences in a woman’s life, and she begins each of these sections with an introduction in which she explores and celebrates the most important elements of life’s journey."...

Read more

Back to top