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all-dressed-fiddleheads

all-dressed fiddleheads

all-dressed fiddleheadsMost people associate Spring vegetables with asparagus, leeks, rhubarb, ramps, and peas.  But for a very brief time, fiddleheads are sold at markets and grocery stores.  They are the unfurled fronds of a young ostrich fern and are collected in the wild before the frond has opened. They are aptly named because they resemble the curled ornamentation (scroll) on the end of a stringed instrument, such as a fiddle.  North American Indians were eating fiddleheads long before the arrival of the first Europeans. The Australian and New Zealand aborigines and the Japanese are also very fond of fiddleheads.

Fiddleheads needs to be cooked either by steaming or placed in boiling water (10 min or until soft) – do not under cook or you may become sick.  Drain and sauté in melted butter with a splash of fresh lemon juice and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.  This is a traditional way to eat a fiddlehead, however, there are oodles of recipes out there.  A few years ago I posted one using gnocchi which did not disappoint!

1/2 pound fiddleheads, washed and cooked
1/2 red bell pepper, cooked (on bbq or pan-fried)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 to 2 teaspoons sesame oil
8 to 10 asparagus stalks, cooked (on bbq, or steamed)

Roughly chop asparagus and red bell pepper (you can also use tomatoes).  In a large bowl toss vegetables and then add soy sauce and sesame oil.  Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Serve as is or toss with pasta.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  Choose firm, bright-green, tightly-curled fronds with their little shells still intact. Eat only the curled head and a small portion of the green stem.  Enjoy!

all-dressed fiddleheads
 
Prep time

Cook time

Total time

 

Author:
Recipe type: vegetarian
Serves: 2 to 4

Ingredients
  • ½ lb. fiddleheads, washed and cooked
  • ½ red bell pepper, cooked (on bbq or pan-fried)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 8 to 10 asparagus stalks, cooked (on bbq, or steamed)

Instructions
  1. Roughly chop asparagus and red bell pepper (you can also use tomatoes). In a large bowl toss vegetables and then add soy sauce and sesame oil. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Serve as is or toss with pasta.
  2. The Culinary Chase’s Note: Choose firm, bright-green, tightly-curled fronds with their little shells still intact. Eat only the curled head and a small portion of the green stem. Enjoy!

 

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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