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Paper, not plastic for leaf and yard waste collection

Friday, Mar. 4, 2016 (Halifax, NS) – The Halifax Regional Municipality is reminding residents that only large paper bags will be accepted for curbside collection of excess leaf and yard waste.

The switch from plastic to paper bags for excess leaf and yard waste is part of a number of amendments to By-law S-600 Respecting Solid Waste Collection and Disposal, that came into effect on August 1, 2015. The municipality allowed both paper and plastic bags for curbside collection during the fall 2015, until such time that local retailers could ensure an adequate supply of the large paper bags were available to customers.

Please note that leaf and yard waste can also be placed in the green bin; only excess material is required to be contained in large paper bags. Material must be placed curbside no later than 7 a.m. on collection day to ensure pick-up.

Residents are also reminded that grass clippings are no longer accepted in the green bin, or with excess leaf and yard waste. We recommend that residents ‘grasscycle’ by leaving clippings on their lawn to restore essential nutrients, use the clippings in a backyard composter, or as mulch for shrubs and gardens. More information on how to grasscycle can be found at www.halifax.ca/recycle/grasscycling.php.

The municipality thanks residents for their continued cooperation and participation in our solid waste management program. For more information on proper preparation of leaf and yard waste materials, please visit www.halifax.ca/recycle.

Source: Release

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