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pearl-couscous-with-fresh-peas-mint-pancetta-ricotta

pearl couscous, fresh peas, mint, pancetta & ricotta

pearl couscous with fresh peas, mint, pancetta & fresh ricottaLast month I posted a recipe on how to make fresh ricotta; a process that was kick-started by me purchasing a bag of fresh shelled peas.  So, here I am today sharing with you that pasta dish I made using the homemade ricotta.  Pearl couscous is also known as Israeli couscous and is larger than regular couscous with a slightly chewy texture (similar to barley).  It’s perfect in a salad, soup, with mixed grilled veggies or use it in risotto.  This dish is super easy to make and takes little time to whip up.

Serves 4
1.5 cups Israeli couscous
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup pancetta, chopped (or 3 slices bacon, chopped)
1 small onion, chopped
1 cup white wine
2.5 cups chicken broth
1 cup shelled fresh peas
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
fresh ricotta (homemade or store bought)

Cook couscous according to packet instructions. Drain pasta but do not rinse (reserve some of the cooking liquid).

In a large frying pan over medium heat cook pancetta until golden brown, then add onion and cook. Stir occasionally until onion is translucent.  Pour in wine, bring to a soft boil, and cook until pan is almost dry. Add broth and simmer.  Toss in peas and cook until al dente. Add couscous, chopped mint and cook, stirring, until pasta is warmed through. Add pasta cooking liquid as needed to adjust consistency. Spoon into bowls. Add dollops of fresh ricotta and scatter fresh mint. Season with freshly ground black pepper and drizzle with olive oil.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: If fresh peas aren’t available, use frozen and allow to thaw before adding to broth.  Enjoy!

pearl couscous with fresh peas, mint & ricotta
 
Prep time

Cook time

Total time

 

Pearl couscous is also known as Israeli couscous and is larger than regular couscous with a slightly chewy texture (similar to barley). It’s perfect in a salad, soup, with mixed grilled veggies or use it in risotto.
Author:
Serves: 4

Ingredients
  • 1.5 cups Israeli couscous
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ cup pancetta, chopped (or 3 slices bacon, chopped)
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2.5 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup shelled fresh peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
  • fresh ricotta (homemade or store bought)

Instructions
  1. Cook couscous according to packet instructions. Drain pasta but do not rinse (reserve some of the cooking liquid).
  2. In a large frying pan over medium heat cook bacon until golden brown, then add onion and cook. Stir occasionally until onion is translucent. Pour in wine, bring to a soft boil, and cook until pan is almost dry. Add broth and simmer. Toss in peas and cook until al dente. Add couscous, chopped mint and cook, stirring, until pasta is warmed through. Add pasta cooking liquid as needed to adjust consistency. Spoon into bowls. Add dollops of fresh ricotta and scatter fresh mint. Season with freshly ground black pepper and drizzle with olive oil.
  3. The Culinary Chase’s Note: If fresh peas aren’t available, use frozen and allow to thaw before adding to broth. Enjoy!

 

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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