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rolled-pork-tenderloin

stuffed and rolled pork tenderloin

rolled porked tenderloinEaster is fast approaching and if you have young children, chances are you have an Easter egg hunt all planned out.  It was a ritual in our home as it was when I was a child.  The thing is, though, as you grow older you begin to wonder what an egg-laying bunny had to do with a religious tradition of Jesus’ resurrection?  Do a little research and you’ll find rabbits are an ancient symbol of fertility and new life while Easter eggs are said to represent Jesus’ emergence from the tomb and resurrection. According to the history.com, decorating eggs for Easter is a tradition that dates back to the 13th century.  Back then eggs were formerly a forbidden food during the Lenten season, so people would paint and decorate them to mark the end of the period of penance and fasting, then eat them on Easter as a celebration.

I don’t know about you, but we always had leftover hard-boiled eggs from Easter!  The easiest solution was to make egg salad or sliced eggs on toast but that gets boring and predictable over time.  As empty nesters, the hunt for the colored egg has long since passed but we do eat hard boiled eggs during the week as a mid-morning snack.  A scrumptious way to utilize a hard-boiled egg is to encase it in sausage meat and fry it (scotch eggs).  Or use in a stuffing.  This dish is inspired by the Argentinian stuffed flank steak called Matambre.  The steak is marinated for a few hours before stuffing, rolling it and then grilled on the barbeque.  Because I’m using pork tenderloin, it’s not necessary to tenderize it.

serves 2 to 4
pork tenderloin (about 1 lb.)
2 hard-boiled eggs, cut into quarters
half bell pepper (red, yellow or orange), thinly sliced
salsa verde or chimichurri sauce

pork tenderloin (about 1 lb.)

Roll cut or butterfly the pork tenderloin and open it like a book. If it is not the same thickness all over, pound the meat. This will help ensure the meat cooks evenly.  Slather salsa verde over pork and place sliced bell peppers followed eggs.  Tightly roll up meat and tie using kitchen twine.

Preheat oven to 425f.  Season meat with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. In a frying pan large enough to hold the tenderloin, add a splash of olive oil and one tablespoon of butter.  When butter has melted, add tenderloin and sear all sides.  Remove from heat and place in the oven.  Roast 15 to 20 minutes, then remove from oven, tent with foil, and let rest 5 minutes before slicing.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Tastes even better cold the next day.  Enjoy!

stuffed and rolled pork tenderloin
 
Prep time

Cook time

Total time

 

This dish is inspired by the Argentinian stuffed flank steak called Matambre. The steak is marinated for a few hours before stuffing, rolling it and grilled on the barbeque. Because I’m using pork tenderloin, it’s not necessary to tenderize it.
Author:
Serves: 2 to 4

Ingredients
  • pork tenderloin (about 1 lb.)
  • 2 or 3 hard-boiled eggs, cut into quarters
  • half bell pepper (red, yellow or orange), thinly sliced
  • salsa verde or chimichurri sauce

Instructions
  1. Roll cut or butterfly the pork tenderloin and open it like a book. If it is not at an even thickness, pound the meat. This will help ensure the meat cooks evenly. Slather salsa verde over pork and place sliced bell peppers followed eggs. Tightly roll up meat and tie using kitchen twine.
  2. Preheat oven to 425f. Season meat with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. In a frying pan large enough to hold the tenderloin, add a splash of olive oil and one tablespoon of butter. When butter has melted, add tenderloin and sear all sides. Remove from heat and place in the oven. Roast 15 to 20 minutes, then remove from oven, tent with foil, and let rest 5 minutes before slicing.

 

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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