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turkey meatballs – with an Asian twist

turkey meatballsThis dish transports my foodie mind back to Thailand.  One of the first things introduced to us was a welcome snack called Miang kham.  The base is a betel nut leaf and piled onto the leaf are fried shallots, ginger, toasted coconut flakes, garlic, lime, peanuts, chopped chili peppers, and topped with a drizzle of palm syrup.

  Then carefully wrapped up and popped into your mouth.  Talk about an explosion of tastes!  I can easily scoff down 6 they’re that good.   It’s a common sight in Thailand (whether from a street vendor or at a cafe) to see lettuce leaves used as a way to contain food.  Minced beef or pork spiced up and placed into a lettuce cup is one of my favorites.  Eating with your hands brings a closer connection to your food and I find it more satisfying.  Turkey meatballs wrapped up in lettuce is another favorite.

These meatballs are perfect for an informal gathering.  And don’t worry about making a mess…you won’t be the only one!

Makes 13 to 15 meatballs
slightly adapted from Williams-Sonoma
453g (1 lb) ground turkey
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
2 tablespoons minced lemongrass, white portion only
2 tablespoons coriander (cilantro) chopped
1 tablespoon ginger, minced
1 garlic clove, chopped
1/4 cup oil
lettuce leaves
2 green onions, thinly sliced
2 limes, cut into wedges

Preheat an oven to 350f. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a bowl, combine the turkey, soy sauce, fish sauce, lemongrass, cilantro, ginger and garlic. Mix well. Roll the meat mixture into 1-inch balls and place on a platter.

In a frying pan heat oil over medium heat.  Add meatballs and fry.  Turn to brown evenly on all sides, about 5 minutes total. Drain on paper towels.  Place meatballs on the prepared baking sheet and bake until cooked through, 3 to 5 minutes.

Arrange a platter with lettuce leaves and place warm meatballs on top. Sprinkle with green onions and squeeze lime over. Serve immediately.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Boston or baby Romaine lettuce works well here or you can use large basil leaves.  Enjoy!

turkey meatballs – with an Asian twist
 
Prep time
20 mins

Cook time
10 mins

Total time
30 mins

 

These meatballs are perfect for an informal gathering. And don’t worry about making a mess…you won’t be the only one!
Author: The Culinary Chase
Recipe type: appetizer
Cuisine: Thai
Serves: 4

Ingredients
  • 453g (1 lb) ground turkey
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons minced lemongrass, white portion only
  • 2 tablespoons coriander (cilantro) chopped
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • ¼ cup oil
  • lettuce leaves
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 limes, cut into wedges
Instructions
  1. Preheat an oven to 350f. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a bowl, combine the turkey, soy sauce, fish sauce, lemongrass, cilantro, ginger and garlic. Mix well. Roll the meat mixture into 1-inch balls and place on a platter.
  3. In a frying pan heat oil over medium heat. Add meatballs and fry. Turn to brown evenly on all sides, about 5 minutes total. Drain on paper towels. Place meatballs on the prepared baking sheet and bake until cooked through, 3 to 5 minutes.
  4. Arrange a platter with lettuce leaves and place warm meatballs on top. Sprinkle with green onions and squeeze lime over. Serve immediately.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Boston or baby Romaine lettuce works well here or you can use large basil leaves. Enjoy!

 

The post turkey meatballs – with an Asian twist appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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