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bruschetta-with-white-anchovies

bruschetta with white anchovies

bruschetta with white anchoviesBruschetta (pronounced bru-sketta) is a classic Italian appetizer consisting of toasted bread slices topped with fresh ripe tomatoes, fresh basil, and extra-virgin olive oil.  There are oodles of variations and I’ve named a few here for you to consider: smashed avocado with chopped tomatoes; zucchini goat cheese bruschetta; smoked salmon with mascarpone cheese.

Last week I bought a package of white anchovies from Hooked Halifax.  I had been searching for these for a long time and was so happy to finally get my hands on them.  White anchovies (also known as boquerones) are deboned and marinated in a vinegar and olive oil solution.  Slightly sweet with a delicate vinegar edge to them, they’re silky smooth, ultra tender and are white due to the oil and vinegar pickling process.  These little guys are delicious on their own and perfect in a salad, on toast, deep-fried with garlic, and even on potato chips!  In Spain, they’re served in bars as tapas.

Serves 2 to 4
white anchovies
4 or 6 cherry tomatoes
1 clove of garlic, cut in half
1 to 2 tablespoons sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
3 to 4 kalamata olives, pitted and chopped
olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
fresh bread, sliced

Cut tomatoes into quarters and remove seeds (use your fingers or knife). Chop quartered tomatoes and place in a small bowl. Add sun-dried tomatoes, olives and a splash of olive oil. Stir to combine and season.  Grill or toast bread slices.  Rub garlic halves over warm bread.  Spoon tomato mixture over slices and top with anchovy fillets.

white-anchoviesThe Culinary Chase’s Note:  Rubbing the bread with garlic helps perfume the slices without a heavy garlic presence.  That said, if you like garlic, chop up and add to tomato mixture.  Enjoy!

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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