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cherry clafoutis

cherry clafoutis by The Culinary ChaseOur local cherries won’t show up in the farmers’ markets or food shops for another month and in the meantime I’ll snack on the ones coming in from California.

  Cherries are delicious, when ripe.  I enjoy them most in their au naturel state but the other day I wanted to highlight them in a clafoutis.  A clafoutis is a French dessert where the batter is custard-like and similar to a pancake batter.  Cherries are traditional in a clafoutis but I’ve used other fruit such as pears, plums, apricots, blackberries.

Tomorrow is Canada’s birthday.  Flags will be flying, barbeques in full swing as families gather and in the evening fireworks ignite the sky.  This clafoutis is a cinch to make and the icing on Canada day celebrations.  Have fun!

Serves 4
slightly adapted from Joy of Baking

1 lb. fresh cherries, pitted
1/2 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs, room temperature
1/4 cup sugar
3/4 cup milk
1 tablespoon melted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

bowl of cherries by The Culinary ChasePreheat oven to 425f. Prepare your baking vessel (9-inch skillet, pie pan, or whatever you choose that is oven-proof) by rubbing butter around the surface then a light dusting of sugar. In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, sugar, salt, vanilla, and butter. Add flour and whisk until smooth.  Arrange cherries in skillet, pie pan or other baking vessel and pour the batter over.  Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until the clafoutis is puffed, set, and golden brown around the edges.  Remove from oven and allow to cool.  Serve as is or with a light dusting of icing sugar.

clafoutisThe Culinary Chase’s Note:  An olive pitter works well to remove the cherry pits but if you don’t have one use a sharp paring knife and slice into the cherry and pluck out the pitt.  Or, if you prefer, leave the pitts in – the traditional French way.  This dessert is best the day you made it.  Enjoy!

cherry clafoutis
 
Prep time
10 mins

Cook time
20 mins

Total time
30 mins

 

A clafoutis is a French dessert where the batter is custard-like and similar to a pancake batter.
Author: The Culinary Chase
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: French
Serves: 4

Ingredients
  • 1 lb. fresh cherries, pitted
  • ½ cup flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425f. Prepare your baking vessel (9-inch skillet, pie pan, or whatever you choose that is oven-proof) by rubbing butter around the surface then a light dusting of sugar. In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, eggs, sugar, salt, vanilla, and butter. Add flour and whisk until smooth. Arrange cherries in skillet, pie pan or other baking vessel and pour the batter over. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until the clafoutis is puffed, set, and golden brown around the edges. Remove from oven and allow to cool. Serve as is or with a light dusting of icing sugar.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: An olive pitter works well to remove the cherry pits but if you don’t have one use a sharp paring knife and slice into the cherry and pluck out the pitt. Or, if you prefer, leave the pitts in – the traditional French way. This dessert is best the day you made it. Enjoy!

 

The post cherry clafoutis appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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