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Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef & CabbageNot sure what to make for dinner?  If you have a farmers’ market nearby, drop in and get inspired.  That’s what happened to me on Saturday.

  Mr. S asked what’s for dinner and I said I wasn’t sure and hoped the market would be my source of inspiration.  Root vegetables seemed to be everywhere from the different stalls.  Some had packages containing carrots, potatoes, cabbage and turnip and were selling them as ingredients for a boiled dinner or what I call corned beef and cabbage.  I picked up my root vegetables from different vendors and the corned beef from Meadowbrook Meat Market.  Corned beef (the term corn refers to the coarse grains of salt used for curing) is the salting of the meat which is then submerged in a brine, refrigerated for 10 days, drained, rinsed off and placed in a large pot of water with root vegetables.

Corned beef and cabbage is an Irish dish with its roots hailing from Cork City and made popular in North America during the early 1900’s from the Irish who emigrated there years ago.  My mom’s side of the family is Irish and this is a dish I have enjoyed over the years.  It’s an easy one-pot dish…if you can boil a potato this meal is a snap to make.  My favorite way to eat this meal is by using a fork to mash the potatoes and vegetables (helps to sop up the broth), dip a chunk of meat into the mustard and top with vegetables.  Yum!

Serves 2
450g corned beef
1 large onion, quartered
3 to 4 bay leaves
2 to 3 potatoes, peeled and cubed
4 or 5 carrots, washed and sliced
small green cabbage, cut into quarters
small turnip, peeled and cut into cubes
grainy mustard or your favorite mustard
1 tablespoon whole peppercorns
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1/2 cinnamon stick
1 tablespoon whole cloves

corned beef ingredientsIn a large pot add corned beef and fill with enough cold water to generously cover the meat.  Add bay leaves, peppercorns, mustard seeds, cinnamon stick and cloves. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer. Cover and let simmer (gentle bubbles) for at least for 2 1/2 to 3 hours or until the meat is fork tender. Remove meat from pot, place on a plate and cover with foil.

Add turnip and bring broth to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and cook, covered, for 15 minutes. Then add potatoes, carrots, cabbage and cook for another 20 minutes or until potatoes are cooked.  Optional – during that last few minutes of cooking, add the meat back to the broth and vegetables to reheat.

Slice the meat and add to the plates.  Then add the veggies with some of the broth and good dollop of grainy mustard on the side.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Before placing the corned beef in a pot, rinse under cold water. I find that the brine in commercial packages tend to be too salty for my liking.  If you have any meat leftover, it makes a wicked corned beef sandwich.  Enjoy!

Corned Beef and Cabbage
 
Prep time
20 mins

Cook time
3 hours

Total time
3 hours 20 mins

 

Corned beef and cabbage is an Irish dish with its roots hailing from Cork City and made popular in North America during the early 1900’s from the Irish who emigrated there years ago. It’s an easy one-pot dish…if you can boil a potato this meal is a snap to make. My favorite way to eat this meal is by using a fork to mash the potatoes and vegetables (helps to sop up the broth), dip a chunk of meat into the mustard and top with vegetables. Yum!
Author: The Culinary Chase
Recipe type: one-pot meal
Cuisine: Irish
Serves: 2

Ingredients
  • 450g corned beef
  • 1 large onion, quartered
  • 3 to 4 bay leaves
  • 2 to 3 potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 4 or 5 carrots, washed and sliced
  • small green cabbage, cut into quarters
  • small turnip, peeled and cut into cubes
  • grainy mustard or your favorite mustard
  • 1 tablespoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • ½ cinnamon stick
  • 1 tablespoon whole cloves
Instructions
  1. In a large pot add corned beef and fill with enough cold water to generously cover the meat. Add bay leaves, peppercorns, mustard seeds, cinnamon stick and cloves. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer. Cover and let simmer (gentle bubbles) for at least for 2½ to 3 hours or until the meat is fork tender. Remove meat from pot, place on a plate and cover with foil.
  2. Add turnip and bring broth to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and cook, covered, for 15 minutes. Then add potatoes, carrots, cabbage and cook for another 20 minutes or until potatoes are cooked. Optional – during that last few minutes of cooking, add the meat back to the broth and vegetables to reheat.
  3. Slice the meat and add to the plates. Then add the veggies with some of the broth and good dollop of grainy mustard on the side.
Notes
Before placing the corned beef in a pot, rinse under cold water. I find that the brine in commercial packages tend to be too salty for my liking. If you have any meat leftover, it makes a wicked corned beef sandwich. Enjoy!

 

The post Corned Beef and Cabbage appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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