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fried-olives

fried olives stuffed with cheese

fried olives stuffed with cheeseWhat is your favorite snack? Do you go back to the same one time after time or do you like to venture out and try new ones? If you have not tried fried olives, you must! They are a crunchy flavor bomb!  I’ve made these a few times now and each time it’s with a different stuffing.  I first stuffed the olives with blue cheese and while they were yummy, I felt the saltiness from the cheese was too much for my palate.  So, next I stuffed with sausage meat combined with cheese curds…whoa!  That was one amazing combo!

Use the stuffing or cheese to help close the olive and don’t worry if the stuffing or cheese is slightly exposed.  Also, before deciding on what olives to use, do a taste test as some can be on the bitter side.  Most places will give you a sample if you’re not sure.Fried olives are lovely on their own or as part of a charcuterie board.  Looking for a wine pairing?  The quintessential glass of prosecco is always a good bet but you can also use pinot grigio or a sauvignon blanc.

olives pits removed (large ones work the best)
any soft cheese such as brie, mozzarella, goat cheese
bread crumbs (I used Panko for a crunchier taste)
oil for frying
1 to 2 eggs, beaten
all-purpose flour

Place the olives in a bowl of cold water for 30 minutes to get rid of the briny flavor. Dry with paper towel.  Make a slit in the olive to make it easier to stuff.

Roll olives in flour, shake off any excess, then dip in beaten egg and coat in bread crumbs.  Pour enough oil into heavy frying pan to a depth of 1-inch and heat to 350f (180c).  Add olives in batches (don’t over crowd) and fry until breadcrumbs turn a golden brown. Use a slotted spoon to remove and transfer olives to paper towels to drain.

fried olivesThe Culinary Chase’s Note:  If you don’t feel like stuffing the olives, most delicatessens offer them already stuffed with cheese, garlic or nuts.  Make a big batch and freeze for later use.  Enjoy!

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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