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monkfish-stew

monkfish stew – a taste of the med

monkfish stew - a taste of the MedAs a cook, one needs to be flexible.  The other day I was cleaning out a cubby hole where a pile of paper with scribbled recipes waited; some were tossed either because the dish was made or it wasn’t something I wanted to make.  I cook according to my mood and when I am at my happiest, so too are the meals I make.  It’s no longer a chore to nourish the body but pure joy.  Unlike the character Tita, from Like Water for Chocolate, I don’t make my family or friends feel the emotion from the food I have prepared – although that would make for a very interesting experiment! 

But I regress.  Back to why it is essential to be flexible when cooking.  The highlight of this dish should have been swordfish but when I was at Hooked Halifax yesterday, I came away with monkfish.  Turns out local swordfish is only available in the summer.  A quick discussion with the fishmonger and it was clear I would have to shift gears.  It’s a fish stew so as much as I wanted swordfish, any meaty and dense fish would do the trick.

If monkfish isn’t available, substitute with cod, haddock, snapper or your favorite fish.  This recipe isn’t complicated nor is it necessary to follow as instructed…use the ingredients as a guide.  If you like your base to have more tomatoes, then add more.  After all, if you’ve made stews before, you know you can ad lib according to taste or what you have on hand.

serves 2
1 lb. monkfish, sliced into chunks
1 to 2 large potatoes, thinly sliced
small onion, chopped
a handful of olives, sliced or chopped
1 tablespoon capers, rinsed
sprinkle of chili pepper flakes
1 1/2 cup tomato sauce

In a frying pan heat a generous amount of olive oil (should cover the bottom).  Add onion and cook until soft.  Add olives, capers, chili pepper flakes and stir.  Then add tomato sauce and stir to combine.  Add potato slices and make sure potato slices are submerged in the sauce.  Cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes or until potatoes are cooked when pierced with a knife.   Place fish on top, cover, and cook a further 5 minutes.  You may need to turn the heat up to medium to achieve a gentle boil.  The monkfish is cooked when the color changes to opaque.  If using other types of fish mentioned above, the fish is cooked when it is easily flaked.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  Be easy on the chili pepper flakes.  There should be a sense of heat but nothing that overpowers the dish.  Looking for a wine pairing suggestion?  We had our first glass of rosé which held up quite nicely to the tomato and heat from the chili pepper flakes.  Enjoy!

monkfish stew – a taste of the med
 
Prep time

Cook time

Total time

 

Author:
Serves: 2

Ingredients
  • 1 lb. monkfish, sliced into chunks
  • 1 to 2 large potatoes, thinly sliced
  • small onion, chopped
  • a handful of olives, sliced or chopped
  • 1 tablespoon capers, rinsed
  • sprinkle of chili pepper flakes
  • 1½ cup tomato sauce

Instructions
  1. In a frying pan heat a generous amount of olive oil (should cover the bottom). Add onion and cook until soft. Add olives, capers, chili pepper flakes and stir. Then add tomato sauce and stir to combine. Add potato slices and make sure potato slices are submerged in the sauce. Cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes or until potatoes are cooked when pierced with a knife. Place fish on top, cover, and cook a further 5 minutes. You may need to turn the heat up to medium to achieve a gentle boil. The monkfish is cooked when the color changes to opaque. If using other types of fish mentioned above, the fish is cooked when it is easily flaked.
  2. The Culinary Chase’s Note: Be easy on the chili pepper flakes. There should be a sense of heat but nothing that overpowers the dish. Looking for a wine pairing suggestion? We had our first glass of rosé which held up quite nicely to the tomato and heat from the chili pepper flakes Enjoy!

 

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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