3:51 am - Saturday, November 25 2017
Home / Food / Pear and Blue Cheese Pizza

 

Pear & Blue Cheese Pizza

Pear and Blue Cheese Pizza

Pear & Blue Cheese PizzaWhat to do with overly ripe pears? A few things come to mind: fruit leather, smoothie, crumble, juice. But it’s Friday night and I’m looking to make pizza so why not incorporate pear and blue cheese.

  I’m into the culinary balancing act of sweet and salty and pear is magical with blue cheese.  Creating your own pizza has unlimited options and easily tailored to meet whatever your dietary needs are.  Is it time to raid the refrigerator and see what needs to be used before going off?  Sometimes I find the most interesting concoctions for my pizzas hidden at the back of the fridge or in the crisper.  Here are some other combinations to contemplate or perhaps inspire you to create your own:  spinach and artichoke, asparagus and sun-dried tomato, lemon slices with smoked mozzarella, grilled veggies and caramelized onions and so on.  The idea, though, is not to load too many items onto the pizza base making it harder for the base to cook evenly.  No one likes a soggy middle and dry edges.

Serves 4
pizza dough, room temperature
1 to 2 ripe pears, sliced
2 tablespoons pesto
blue cheese, crumbled or sliced
olive oil, for drizzling

blue cheese & pear pizza ingredientsPreheat oven to 510f (or the highest temperature setting) and allow at least 20 minutes before adding the pizza.  Place rack in the middle of the oven or if you have a baking stone, place it in the lower middle of your oven.  Shape pizza dough and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Smear pesto over base, add pear slices and blue cheese.  Cook 8 to 10 minutes or until puffy and golden brown.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  A super easy meal to make in under 20 minutes.  Pair with a glass of wine and the weekend is off to a great start.  Enjoy!

The post Pear and Blue Cheese Pizza appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

You might also like...

butter-tart

butter tarts (a delightful Canadian dessert)

As a youngster and even now, getting my hands on a butter tart is a culinary delight.  One bite and the filling is drip-off-your-chin runny or slightly set, ooey gooey sweet, and encased by a flaky crust that melts in your mouth. ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *