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Roasted Pork Belly

roasted pork bellyWhen we first moved to Hong Kong, one of our all-time favorite fast foods was char siu fun (Chinese bbq pork over rice with a side of ginger sauce – yum!).

  This was our first introduction to pork belly and before that I hadn’t heard of it.  Well, that’s not strictly accurate.  Although I grew up in the country and during my teenage years my parents had a mini hobby farm with pigs and chickens, I never knew bacon was from the pig’s belly.  Like most, (I assume) pork came from a pig and unless you’re a butcher that’s about as much of the anatomy I wanted to know about.

Pork belly doesn’t sound like it belongs on a dinner plate but oh how wrong I was.  Roasting pork belly results in sumptuous, moist, and tender meat.  Ask your butcher to cut to the size you want.  Porchetta, an Italian pork roast, is another delicious way to use pork belly.

Serves 4
1.5kg pork belly (skin on)
2 to 3 cloves of garlic
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
pinch of ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
carrots
new potatoes

Score the pork belly skin and fat in a criss-cross pattern but don’t cut into the meat.

marinated pork bellyIn a mortar and pestle crush garlic, ground cloves, caraway seeds, chili, and a pinch of sea salt.  Mash to a paste. Stir in olive oil and lemon juice – you may need to add a bit more olive oil if rub is too dry. Rub marinade over the pork and marinate at room temperature for half an hour.

Preheat the oven to 425f.

pork belly CollageArrange carrots and potatoes in a roasting pan and place the pork on top. Roast for 30 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 340f.   Roast for a further 2.5 hours or until the pork is tender and cooked through, and the skin is crisp. Rest the pork belly 10 to 15 minutes, then slice and serve with the roasted carrots and potatoes.

roasted pork bellyThe Culinary Chase’s Note: If you have any leftovers, the meat is lovely chopped up in a ragù, in fajitas, fried rice, or shred it to make a pulled pork sandwich. Enjoy!

Roasted Pork Belly
 
Cook time
3 hours

Total time
3 hours

 

Although I grew up in the country and during my teenage years my parents had a mini hobby farm with pigs and chickens, I never knew bacon was from the pig’s belly. Like most, (I assume) pork came from a pig and unless you’re a butcher that’s about as much of the anatomy I wanted to know about.
Author: The Culinary Chase
Recipe type: dinner
Serves: 4

Ingredients
  • 1.5kg pork belly (skin on)
  • 2 to 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • ½ teaspoon coriander seeds
  • pinch of ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon chili flakes
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • carrots
  • new potatoes
Instructions
  1. Score the pork belly skin and fat in a criss-cross pattern but don’t cut into the meat.
  2. In a mortar and pestle crush garlic, ground cloves, caraway seeds, chilli, and a pinch of sea salt. Mash to a paste. Stir in olive oil and lemon juice – you may need to add a bit more olive oil if rub is too dry. Rub marinade over the pork and stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  3. Preheat the oven to 425f.
  4. Arrange carrots and potatoes in a roasting pan and place the pork on top. Roast for 30 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 340f. Roast for a further 2.5 hours or until the pork is tender and cooked through, and the skin is crisp. Rest the pork belly, uncovered, 15 to 20 minutes, then cut into slices and serve with the roasted carrots and potatoes.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: If you have any leftovers, the meat is lovely chopped up in a ragù, in fajitas, fried rice, or shred it to make a pulled pork sandwich. Enjoy!

 

The post Roasted Pork Belly appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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