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fried-halloumi-with-salad

salad with fried halloumi

salad topped with fried halloumiHalloumi, a Cypriot cheese made from a mixture of goat and sheep milk, has a high melting point and can easily be fried, grilled or roasted.  When fried or grilled, it develops a delicious crust that surrounds a slightly springy, mild interior that squeaks between your teeth when chewed!  Its uses are so versatile: skewer cheese chunks and place on a grill (brush with olive oil), make halloumi fries, wrap in prosciutto (grill or pan-fry), sliced and added to baked peppers, or shrimp and halloumi skewers with mint salsa.

Summer cooking tends to become more relaxed as we spend more time outside and barbeques are used frequently.  The heat makes me seek out ways to stay cool in the kitchen while trying to keep a reasonable balance of healthy eating.  For the salad, you can make your own or loosely follow what I’ve suggested below.  This dish is perfect for lunch or a light dinner.

Serves 2
romaine lettuce, use about 4 to 6 leaves (washed and pat dry), roughly chopped
handful of rocket, roughly chopped
small garlic clove, minced
1 ear of corn, cooked
3 to 4 small tomatoes, quartered
small cucumber, peeled, seeds removed and chopped
1/2 halloumi cheese package, cut into slices (reserve other half for a snack)

Cook corn by a method you prefer either by boiling, grilling or in the microwave.  Allow to cool enough to handle and run a knife down the edges of the corn to shave off the kernels.  In a large bowl add chopped romaine leaves followed by corn, garlic, tomatoes, cucumber.  Toss to combine.  For a simple dressing use extra-virgin olive oil and white balsamic vinegar.  Or, use rice vinegar and olive oil with a light splash of sesame oil.  Season salad with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Fry the halloumi slices in a dry non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat until golden on both sides.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  If you’re monitoring your salt intake, soak the cheese whole in cool water for 20 minutes.  Pat dry and cook.  Enjoy!

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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