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Italian-egg-drop-soup

stracciatella soup (italian egg drop soup)

stracciatella - Italian egg drop soupNo muss, no fuss. This soup is one of the easiest you’ll ever make and with minimal ingredients.  What’s more, you can have it ready to serve in less than 15 minutes!  Egg drop soup is a favorite in Rome and in central Italy.  Stracciatella refers to the shredding of the eggs into little rags as they are stirred into the hot broth.  This is a light soup and was consumed by Italy’s poor.  I find some of the best tasting food Italy has to offer hails from the resourcefulness and creativity of its people when money was tight.

Other versions of this soup include the addition of spinach leaves, pasta or meat.  I prefer the simplistic of ingredients and paying homage to those who could not afford such luxuries as meat on a regular basis.

Serves 4
6 cups of rich broth (either chicken or beef)
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 large eggs
2 or 3 tablespoons minced parsley
zest of half a lemon (optional)

Heat stock in a pot over medium-high heat until simmering. In a mixing bowl add cheese, zest, and eggs; whisk together. Slowly pour egg mixture into the soup while stirring.  Gently stir until eggs are set or look like torn little rags. Ladle into bowls and top with parsley and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  If you don’t have time to make a rich broth, ask your butcher.  Most should know where to buy and if all else fails, pick up a container from the grocery store.  You may need to amp up the seasoning as I find most store-bought broths are bland.  Enjoy!

stracciatella soup (<g class=”gr_ gr_64 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling ins-del multiReplace” id=”64″ data-gr-id=”64″>italian</g> egg drop soup)
 
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Author:
Recipe type: soup
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4

Ingredients
  • 6 cups of rich broth (either chicken or beef)
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 or 3 tablespoons minced parsley
  • zest of half a lemon (optional)

Instructions
  1. Heat stock in a pot over medium-high heat until simmering. In a mixing bowl add cheese, zest, and eggs; whisk together. Slowly pour egg mixture into the soup while stirring. Gently stir until eggs are set or look like torn little rags. Ladle into bowls and top with parsley and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  2. The Culinary Chase’s Note: If you don’t have time to make a rich broth, ask your butcher. Most should know where to buy and if all else fails, pick up a container from the grocery store. You may need to amp up the seasoning as I find most store-bought broths are bland. Enjoy!

 

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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