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iced green tea

iced green teaCold, nonalcoholic iced drinks are always welcomed on a hot, humid day and there’s a variety to satisfy every palate.  Iced tea drinks have been around since the early 1900’s.

  When we lived in Asia, bubble tea was all the rage.  I tried it, heck I’ll try anything once!  The tea is infused with crushed fruit or milk (or combo of both!) and chewy tapioca balls are added.  It’s an acquired taste but can be nice if the right crushed fruit combination is achieved.  Thai iced tea is another cold drink I also tried when we lived in Bangkok.  It’s a combination of black tea mixed with two types of milk.  Condensed milk and sugar are mixed with the tea before it is poured over ice and then topped with evaporated milk.  Another acquired taste (too sweet for me).  We enjoy our cup of green tea at lunch but the other day the humidity was making everything feel sticky so I decided to make a cold brew.  Making your own iced tea is a cinch.

Makes 4 cups
2 to 4 green tea bags (I used 2)
4 cups of simmering water
maple syrup, to taste
lemon wedge
1 or 2 strips of lemon peel

Make a pot of tea like you would if you were making it hot. Allow the tea to steep for at least 5 minutes. The longer the tea steeps, the stronger the brew and darker the color. Remove tea bags and pour into a pitcher. Add lemon peel and maple syrup to taste.  Squeeze lemon wedge over pitcher and stir.  Refrigerate tea until cool.

To serve, add ice to the pitcher and fill glasses with ice. Pour the tea over the ice.  Add a lemon slice as a garnish.

pouring iced green teaThe Culinary Chase’s Note:  Using maple syrup or honey eliminates the need to make a simple syrup.  Enjoy!

Iced Green Tea
 
Author: The Culinary Chase
Recipe type: cold drink
Serves: 2 to 4

Ingredients
  • 2 to 4 green tea bags
  • 4 cups of simmering water
  • maple syrup, to taste
  • lemon wedge
  • 1 or 2 strips of lemon peel
Instructions
  1. Make a pot of tea like you would if you were making it hot. Allow the tea to steep for at least 5 minutes. The longer the tea steeps, the stronger the brew and darker the color. Remove tea bags and pour into a pitcher. Add lemon peel and maple syrup to taste. Squeeze lemon wedge over pitcher and stir. Refrigerate tea until cool.
  2. To serve, add ice to the pitcher and fill glasses with ice. Pour the tea over the ice. Add a lemon slice as a garnish.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Using maple syrup or honey eliminates the need to make a simple syrup. Enjoy!

 

The post iced green tea appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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