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prosciutto-wrapped-tomato

prosciutto wrapped tomato

prosciutto wrapped tomatoThe holiday season is just around the corner and it’s that time of the year when we’re out socializing and entertaining at home. The thought of entertaining can be intimidating for both the novice and the experienced.  When I know I am having friends over, I generate a plan, cook ahead, stay within my limits and remember it is only a party – a time to have fun.  Everybody loves a party where they can reconnect, celebrate and get away from the stresses of daily life.  Entertaining is also about trying new things, new ideas and new techniques.  Which brings me to this insanely delicious dish:  prosciutto wrapped tomato.

Mr. S and I enjoy a relaxed dining atmosphere when we have friends or family over;  clinking of glasses around the kitchen island as I serve finger food.  We like food that’s unpretentious.  Simple ingredients that work well together to deliver a meal that leaves everyone satiated and perhaps, asking for more!  Prepare the tomatoes in advance but, if you’re like me and you have room, cook while your guests are in the kitchen…most are intrigued to see how it’s done.

Serves 2
slightly adapted from Chef Peter Zambri

2 tomatoes
pinch or two of dried basil
4 to 6 slices of prosciutto, thinly sliced
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
1 to 2 anchovy fillets, roughly chopped
1 to 2 teaspoons red chili pepper flakes
fresh sage leaves
2 cloves of garlic, thickly sliced
Parmesan cheese, grated
bread crumbs

red tomatoUse a sharp paring knife to core tomatoes. Make a small X mark on the bottom of the tomatoes. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Drop tomatoes into the boiling water and watch for their skins to start to wrinkle and split (up to 1 minute) remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to an ice water bath.

When cool enough to handle, use your fingers or a paring knife to peel back the tomato skins. Lightly dry tomatoes with paper towel.  Sprinkle dried basil in the cored out section of the tomato.  Take one slice of prosciutto and wrap it around the tomato. Use another slice to cover and mold with your hands. Cup the tomato in your hand and use a gentle force allowing the prosciutto to adhere to the flesh of the tomato.  Depending on size of tomato, you may need to use another slice of prosciutto.

In a medium-sized frying pan over medium heat, add butter and olive oil. Allow butter to melt then add anchovy, chili flakes, garlic, and about 8 sage leaves (more if you like). Once the anchovy has dissolved, add tomatoes. Turn heat down to low, rotating tomatoes as the prosciutto starts to turn a golden brown. Baste with the butter/olive oil mixture.

prosciutto-wrapped tomatoesTo serve, on a small plate add a pinch or two of dried bread crumbs (this helps absorb the sauce) and place tomato on top. Garnish top of tomato with sage, garlic and spoon some of the butter/olive oil sauce on top. Add grated Parmesan and serve right away.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:
I made this twice in two days it was so good! The first time I forgot to blanch and remove the tomato skins. The second time, with the skins removed, the flavor and texture was much nicer. When cooking the prosciutto wrapped tomatoes, a low heat is key as it gently cooks the garlic which releases an amazing aroma as well as a sweetness when eaten.  Enjoy!

prosciutto wrapped tomato
 
When I know I am having friends over, I generate a plan, cook ahead, stay within my limits and remember it is only a party – a time to have fun. Everybody loves a party where they can reconnect, celebrate and get away from the stresses of daily life. Entertaining is also about trying new things, new ideas and new techniques. Which brings me to this insanely delicious dish: prosciutto wrapped tomato.
Author:
Recipe type: Appetizer
Cuisine: Italian

Ingredients
  • 2 tomatoes
  • pinch or two of dried basil
  • 4 to 6 slices of prosciutto, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 to 2 anchovy fillets, roughly chopped
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons red chili pepper flakes
  • fresh sage leaves
  • 2 cloves of garlic, thickly sliced
  • Parmesan cheese, grated
  • bread crumbs

Instructions
  1. Use a sharp paring knife to core tomatoes. Make a small X mark on the bottom of the tomatoes. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Drop tomatoes into the boiling water and watch for their skins to start to wrinkle and split (up to 1 minute) remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to an ice water bath.
  2. When cool enough to handle, use your fingers or a paring knife to peel back the tomato skins. Lightly dry tomatoes with paper towel. Sprinkle dried basil in the cored out section of the tomato. Take one slice of prosciutto and wrap it around the tomato. Use another slice to cover and mold with your hands. Cup the tomato in your hand and use a gentle force allowing the prosciutto to adhere to the flesh of the tomato. Depending on size of tomato, you may need to use another slice of prosciutto.
  3. In a medium-sized frying pan over medium heat, add butter and olive oil. Allow butter to melt then add anchovy, chili flakes and about 8 sage leaves (more if you like). Once the anchovy has dissolved, add tomatoes. Turn heat down to low, rotating tomatoes as the prosciutto starts to turn a golden brown. Baste with the butter/olive oil mixture.
  4. To serve, on a small plate add a pinch or two of dried bread crumbs (this helps absorb the sauce) and place tomato on top. Garnish top of tomato with sage, garlic and spoon some of the butter/olive oil sauce on top. Add grated Parmesan and serve right away.

Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: I made this twice in two days it was so good! The first time I forgot to blanch and remove the tomato skins. The second time, with the skins removed, the flavor and texture was much nicer. When cooking the prosciutto wrapped tomatoes, a low heat is key as it gently cooks the garlic which releases an amazing aroma as well as a sweetness when eaten. Enjoy!

 

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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