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Peanut Butter Cookies

Melrose Peanut Butter Cookies

Peanut Butter CookiesThis peanut butter cookie recipe is from my maternal grandmother. I’m not sure what the name Melrose has to do with the cookie but I can definitely say it had absolutely nothing to do with Melrose Place! My grandmother enjoyed cooking but her first love was being an artist.

Gladys Ryan (nee May) was a spirited, 5-foot tall, entrepreneur and in her day, if you weren’t married by the age of 20 you were considered a spinster. My grandmother had other plans to pursue and being a wife wasn’t one of them! Born in 1901, she left Saint John when she finished high school to work in the art department for Jordan Marsh (later converted to Macy’s) in Boston.  The artist in her blossomed at Jordan Marsh but after five years she returned home because her father was ill. Driving back must have given Nanny plenty to think about (imagine, she had her own car!).  Full of ideas and experience from Jordan Marsh, she opened her own art studio in the wharf (now known as Market Square) where local businesses would commission her to design art work for them.  Her biggest client was Scovil Brothers (a department store) where she created drawings of people wearing the latest outfits for their brochures as well as large (2 to 3 feet long) silhouettes of people atop banks of built-in drawers within the store.  My grandmother married at the age of 35…well ahead of her time!

Nanny Ryan (sitting) with her sister (standing) & my mom's sister (sitting)

Nanny Ryan (sitting) with her sister standing & my mom’s sister (sitting)

I, like a million other kids, grew up on peanut butter. It was a go-to sandwich when the cupboard was getting bare or short on time.  Who in North America hasn’t had a PB & J sandwich?  I always thought peanut butter came from a nut but in fact the peanut is a legume (edible seeds enclosed in pods)!

Makes 20
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon salt
sea salt for topping

peanut butter ingredientsPreheat oven to 350f. In a medium-sized bowl mix flour, baking soda and salt. In another bowl beat peanut butter, butter, and sugars until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Gradually add flour mixture, beating well after each addition. Roll into small balls and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Flatten each ball with the tines of a fork by using a criss-cross pattern. Lightly sprinkle sea salt over cookie dough (optional). Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on baking sheet.

Peanut Butter Cookie CollageThe Culinary Chase’s Note: The addition of sea salt might seem strange, but it goes well. If you’re not sure, sprinkle only a couple. It helps balance the sweetness of the two sugars but you be the judge. Store cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days (if they last that long). Or, pop in the freezer for up to 1 month. Thaw at room temperature before serving. Enjoy!

Melrose Peanut Butter Cookies

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I, like a million other kids, grew up on peanut butter. It was a go-to sandwich when the cupboard was getting bare or short on time. Who in North America hasn’t had a PB & J sandwich? I always thought peanut butter came from a nut but in fact the peanut is a legume (edible seeds enclosed in pods)!

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • sea salt for topping

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350f. In a medium-sized bowl mix flour, baking soda and salt. In another bowl beat peanut butter, butter, and sugars until light and fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Gradually add flour mixture, beating well after each addition. Roll into small balls and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Flatten each ball with the tines of a fork by using a criss-cross pattern. Lightly sprinkle sea salt over cookie dough (optional). Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on baking sheet.
  2. The Culinary Chase’s Note: The addition of sea salt might seem strange, but it goes well. If you’re not sure, sprinkle only a couple. It helps balance the sweetness of the two sugars but you be the judge. Store cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days (if they last that long). Or, pop in the freezer for up to 1 month. Thaw at room temperature before serving. Enjoy!

http://theculinarychase.com/2014/11/melrose-peanut-butter-cookies/

The post Melrose Peanut Butter Cookies appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

About Heather Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. Over the years, I began to change our diet to include more vegetables, pulses, whole grains and less red meat. Don’t get me wrong, we love our meat, just not in super-size portions (too hard for the body to digest). I always use the palm of my hand as a guide to portion control when eating red meat. If the meat is larger than my hand, I save that portion for another day. Also, if the veggies on your plate look colorful (think the colors of the rainbow) – red, green, yellow, orange etc. then you’re most likely getting the right amount of nutrients per meal. I post recipes that I think help maintain a healthy body. I use the 80/20 rule – 80% of the time I make a conscious effort to eat healthy and 20% for when I want french fries with gravy (poutine). Balance is the key and to enjoy life with whatever comes my way. Thanks for visiting!

 

The views and opinions expressed in this content are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of haligonia.ca.

http://theculinarychase.com/

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